Second ISA Forum of Sociology, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1-4 August 2012

Joint Sessions

RC02RC07
Alternatives to neoliberal globalization: Comparing counter-hegemonic projects - Part I

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society and RC07 Futures Research [host committee]

Session in English

Organisers
William K. CARROLL, University of Victoria, Canada, wcarroll@uvic.ca, RC02
Markus S. SCHULZ, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, United States, isarc07@gmail.com, RC07

The global financial system has increased inequalities through booms and crises. Far from collapsing, global capitalism keeps permuting. The rise of Brazil, Russia, India and China has led to a new multipolarity. Transnationally linked civil society actors protested the neoliberal mode of globalization and the activities of transnational corporations, governments, and intergovernmental organizations such as the World Bank and the IMF.

The huge demonstrations in Prague, Washington, Seattle, Genoa, and Cancún were televised to global audiences, as had been images of the earlier Zapatista uprising of Mayan peasants in Chiapas. Latin American countries have catapulted into positions of power a wave of new populist leaders from Hugo Chávez in Venezuela to Ollanta Humala in Peru. Spending cuts in the wake of the recent financial crisis have triggered protest throughout the Euro zone, most visibly in Greece and Spain.

What alternative projects do the diverse actors in the Global South and the Global North articulate? How can they overcome the linguistic and cultural barriers, and how do they manage to network across borders and vastly different local contexts? How do they interact with transnational elites, the mass media, and repressive forces? – This session welcomes scholars working on any of these aspects from a theoretical, empirical, and/or normative viewpoint.

 

RC02RC17/1
Organizing global and domestic finances

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society [host committee] and RC17 Sociology of Organizations

Session in English

Organisers
Jose OSSANDON, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile, jose.ossandon@udp.cl­
Liz MCFALL, Open University, United Kingdom, e.r.mcfall@open.ac.uk, RC17

Recent fluctuations in finance have important implications for contemporary sociology. The impressive technological transformation of financial markets since the 70s attracted the attention of Science and Technology (STS) scholars who have made a very convincing case for introducing non human agents (such as: screens, formulae, trading rooms, and economics itself) as essential characters of economic lives. Related work has drawn attention to the processes through which an apparently ever increasing array of objects are measured, calculated, valued, qualified, financialised or in some other sense `economized`.

More recently, the sub-prime crisis has dramatically exposed how finance is not just a dis-embedded game played by a global elite, but is intricately tied to domestic economies. In this context, increasing sociological attention is given to the analysis of retail finance (such as mortgage and consumer credit) and insurance, and the complex socio-technical chains that connect these services (through risk ratings, securitization, and even public guaranteed credit) and global markets.

Finally, the crisis has become a compulsory impulse to rethink classical concerns in economic and organisational sociology, such as the relationship between the economic and the `social`, between regulations and the management of technological uncertainty and the balance between market, quasi-market and non-market players in the organization of global finance. What all these developments point to is the significance of the techniques, technologies, processes and practices which combine to organize global and domestic finance. Papers responding to or extending these issues are welcome.

 

RC02RC17/2
Organizing markets

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society and RC17 Sociology of Organizations [host committee]

Session in English and Spanish (English preferred)

Organisers and Chairs
Daniel FRIDMAN, University of Victoria, Canada, dfridman@uvic.ca, RC02
Jose OSSANDON, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile, jose.ossandon@udp.cl
Dean PIERIDES, University of Melbourne, Australia, d.pierides@unimelb.edu.au, RC17

“Organizing a market” is normally associated with central planning. However in neo-liberal contexts markets are also organized. In this latter case organization has to do with both the already classical sociological suggestion that exchange is embedded in institutions and regulations, as well as the consequences of a particular form of government that has proliferated since the late seventies, namely producing markets. In this context, markets have been created in areas as diverse as education, health, transport, housing and even pollution. To describe and to understand these processes has become one of the central concerns of contemporary sociology.

Some of the issues that have gathered more attention are: the consolidation of economics as a global advisory profession and the performative character of this type of knowledge; the costly processes of enacting the subjects and objects of exchange (firms, consumers, goods, price making mechanisms); and the continuous surprises and conflicts produced when the outcomes of the markets are not what were expected (failures, crises, crashes).

In this session, we welcome articles that both describe the process of producing and organizing markets as policies and that use their evidence not only to criticize marketization but also to reflect on how sociological knowledge could be useful to find better and alternative forms of managing these complex organizations.

 

RC02RC23
Knowledge based economies and networks of knowledge transfer

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society [host committee] and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology

Session in English and Spanish

Organisers and Chairs
Julian CARDENAS, University of Antioquia, Columbia, julian.cardenas@analisisderedes.com
Gabriel VELEZ-CUARTAS, University of Antioquia, Columbia, gabrielvelezcuartas@yahoo.com.mx, RC23

Many academics and researchers have demonstrated the strong relationship among science and technology investment and GPI growth. This statement has become a fruitful inspiration to relatively new development recipes for developing countries. Some countries have growth. Nevertheless, other countries are still far away from thinking about a knowledge-based economy. Why? What are the consequences?

Thousands of corporations, governments and universities across the world have benefited from knowledge transfer. Networks have played a key role to expand, assimilate and adapt global knowledge. What are the configurations of these networks at regional and national level? What are the impacts of adopting a knowledge development model that has been generalized to every national system? How could a knowledge regime emerge and what are their characteristics and possibilities in different countries and regions?

This joint session tries to understand successes and failures in implementing knowledge-based economy models; conflicts between knowledge, economic and political regimens; and the configuration and consequences of knowledge networks on economics, politics and society. Our goal is to present and discuss the determinants, mechanisms and impacts of knowledge-based economies and networks of knowledge transfer.

 

RC02RC24
Conflicting economies, livelihoods and social-environmental interactions in coastal regions

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society and RC24 Environment and Society [host committee]

Organisers
Mark C. J. STODDART, Memorial University, Canada, mstoddart@mun.ca, RC24
William K. CARROLL, University of Victoria, Canada, wcarroll@uvic.ca, RC02

The decline of fisheries around the world has a profound impact on livelihoods and collective identities in coastal communities. However, coastal environments remain key sites of social interaction with nature, through tourism, offshore oil development and aquaculture. Each of these economies and livelihoods offers a different vision for the future of coastal communities, and they produce different types of environmental risks and impacts. They also often come into conflict with each other, as was spectacularly demonstrated by the impacts of the recent BP oil spill on local fisheries and tourist economies in the Gulf of Mexico. This session invites papers that analyse the tensions and conflicts among divergent models of economic development and social interaction with coastal environments.

 

RC02RC44
Organizing the production of alternative visions to support social justice

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society and RC44 Labor Movements [host committee]

Organisers and Chairs
William K. CARROLL, University of Victoria, Canada, wcarroll@uvic.ca, RC02
Vishwas SATGAR, University of Witwatersrand, South Africa, copac@icon.co.za

Since the mid-1970s, but particularly since the 1990s, alternative think tanks, policy groups, popular institutes and other sites of counter-hegemonic knowledge production and mobilization have generated important ideas, both visionary and strategic, for a ‘globalization from below’ in which transnational social movements have often been leading protagonists. Groups such as the Transnational Institute (Amsterdam), Instituto Paulo Freire and Escola Nacional Florestan Fernandes (Sao Paulo), Focus on the Global South (Bangkok), Centre for Civil Society (Durban) and Asia Monitor Resource Centre (Hong Kong) have served as ‘collective intellectuals’, critiquing corporate agendas and promoting democratic alternatives to neoliberal globalization in contestations that often transect national borders. This panel session welcomes papers and presentations that explore the challenges and possibilities in organizing the production of alternative visions, strategies, critiques and modes of analysis to support social and eco-justice. How is counter-hegemonic knowledge produced, mobilized and articulated with on-the ground activism? What alternative projects and methodologies are emerging for strengthening anti-systemic forces? How does counter-hegemonic knowledge production contribute to a new left anti-capitalist politics and to the formation of new subjectivities from below? Papers that take up issues relating to labour movements and/or economy and society are particularly welcome, as are presentations from activist intellectuals directly engaged in the production of alternative visions and strategies

 

RC04RC10/1
Round Table Social justice and participation: The role of higher education. Part I

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management [host committee]

Organisers
Isabel DA COSTA, CNRS-IDHE, France, idacosta@idhe.ens-cachan.fr, RC10
Iasonas LAMPRIANOU, University of Cyprus, lamprianou.iasonas@ucy.ac.cy

The purpose of the session is to continue the debate and exchange started during the conference jointly organized by RC4 and RC10 in 2011 on the issue. Papers are invited that consider ways in which higher education plays a role in facilitating social justice and democratic participation, and ways in which hurdles in access to higher education and inequalities may hinder social justice and participation. Papers may consider issues of higher education, social justice, and participation in particular regions or countries, as well as make cross-cultural comparisons.

 

RC04RC10/2
Round Table Social justice and participation: The role of higher education. Part II

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management [host committee]

Isabel DA COSTA, CNRS-IDHE, France, idacosta@idhe.ens-cachan.fr, RC10
Iasonas LAMPRIANOU, University of Cyprus, lamprianou.iasonas@ucy.ac.cy

 

RC04RC10/3
Round Table Social justice and participation: The role of higher education. Part III

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management [host committee]

Isabel DA COSTA, CNRS-IDHE, France, idacosta@idhe.ens-cachan.fr, RC10
Iasonas LAMPRIANOU, University of Cyprus, lamprianou.iasonas@ucy.ac.cy

 

RC04RC13/1
Leisure education: Social justice in life-long learning. Part I

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee]

Organisers
A. Gary DWORKIN, University of Houston, United States, gdworkin@mail.uh.edu, RC04
Ishwar MODI, International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Chairs
Dionysios GOUVIAS, University of the Aegean, Greece, dgouvias@rhodes.aegean.gr, RC04
Karl SPRACKLEN, Leeds Metropolitan University, United Kingdom, k.spracklen@leedsmet.ac.uk, RC13

The concept of Lifelong Learning (LLL) is connected both with the emancipation of the citizen from the confinements created by a lack of training in these special skills demanded by the new economic activities, as well as with the social cohesion. Such learning occurs both in the context of leisure activities and work-related training. In various documents –for example those produced in the aftermath of the declaration of the so-called ‘Lisbon Strategy’ in 2000 for the EU countries— the LLL was defined as every learning activity that takes place throughout one’s own life and aims at the improvement of knowledge, skills and abilities, within a framework of personal development and of personal engagement in the labor market.

However, many critics argue that one core dimension of the life-long learning strategies so far implemented is the increasing cultivation of the idea of ‘personal responsibility’ for any future ‘investment’ that a person may wish to make in order to improve her/his negotiating power in a highly competitive labor market. Amidst the global financial crisis and increasing ‘downsizing’ of the Welfare State, what kind of barriers and inequalities in access to LLL do exist, in what ways are those manifested, how adult learners perceive their potentials and future educational and occupational prospects within this framework of opportunities?

Papers in this session should focus particularly on the interconnection between leisure and lifelong learning.

 

RC04RC13/2
Leisure education: Social justice in life-long learning. Part II

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee]

Organisers
A. Gary DWORKIN, University of Houston, United States, gdworkin@mail.uh.edu, RC04
Ishwar MODI, International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Chairs
Dionysios GOUVIAS, University of the Aegean, Greece, dgouvias@rhodes.aegean.gr, RC04
Karl SPRACKLEN, Leeds Metropolitan University, United Kingdom, k.spracklen@leedsmet.ac.uk, RC13

 

RC04RC13/3
Leisure education: Social justice in life-long learning. Part III

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee]

Organisers
A. Gary DWORKIN, University of Houston, United States, gdworkin@mail.uh.edu, RC04
Ishwar MODI, International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Chairs
Dionysios GOUVIAS, University of the Aegean, Greece, dgouvias@rhodes.aegean.gr, RC04
Karl SPRACKLEN, Leeds Metropolitan University, United Kingdom, k.spracklen@leedsmet.ac.uk, RC13

 

RC05RC13RC21
Leisure, urbanization, migration and ethnic relations

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations , RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC21 Regional and Urban Development

Organisers
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Azril BACAL, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Peru, bazril1@gmail.com, RC05
Yuri KAZEPOV, University of Urbino, Italy, yuri.kazepov@uniurb.it, RC21
Chairs
Teus J. KAMPHORST, Foundation Wageningen International Centre of Excellence on Development of Sustainable Leisure, the Netherlands, teus.kamphorst@wice-dsl.nl, RC13
Jan Willem DUYVENDAK, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, duyvendak@uva.nl, RC21

The postmodern context of urbanization and migration has become a part of life. The stresses and strains caused by intermingling have resulted not only in new forms of leisure that create an enabling environment for integration and comfort but also possibilities for inter-cultural exchange (including ethnic and racial dimensions) as new entrants introduce the modes of thought and leisure that they bring with them. Tension and/or conflict are also possible outcomes. The aim of this session is to draw together researchers with various sub-disciplinary specialities to examine these phenomena.

 

RC05RC32
The ethics of intersectional politics and the challenges to alliances and coalition building in and outside academe

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC32 Women in Society [host committee]

Organiser
Sirma BILGE, Université de Montréal, Canada, sirma.bilge@umontreal.ca, RC05-RC32

What are the ethics of intersectional politics and alliance building? What are the do’s and don’ts of being an "ally"? Taking as point of departure Crenshaw’s pioneering analysis of political intersectionality, or how competing single-issue politics erase particular individuals and groups, foregrounding certain forms of ‘problems’ and ‘victims’ over others, the session will deal with the ethics and potentials of intersectional politics, and the challenges of building alliances and coalitions between distinctive social movements, which have different social justice agendas that are often organized around competing single issue/identity claims, in particular antiracism, feminism and gay and lesbian activism. Central to our discussions will be a) the adverse effects of the partitioning of political space and civil society around single issues, despite loud declarations of commitment to diversity and multiple issues by many organizations and movements, and b) how the ways in which debates and problems are framed and organizations structured lead to various forms of exclusions and silencing through denial, displacement, misidentification, tokenism and cooptation.

 

RC05RC38/1
Where are you from? Experiences of exclusion, marginalization and racism. Part I

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations [host committee] and RC38 Biography and Society

Organisers
Helma LUTZ, University of Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Lutz@soz.uni-frankfurt.de, RC05, RC38
Roswitha BRECKNER, University of Vienna, Austria, roswitha.breckner@univie.ac.at, RC38

In this joint session we intend to explore from a (micro) sociological perspective how people deal with experiences of exclusion, marginalisation and racism. In many countries all over the world the composition of citizens is now including a variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds. The question ‘Where are you from?’ addressing the descent of ‘another one’, can be considered as expression of innocent true interest and empathy. However, the question itself always carries unintended connotations and is embedded in power relations and ethnic/ racial hierarchies; it can, therefore, be understood as discursive tool of ‘doing othering’.
We wish to invite scholars’ contributions to a debate on the biographical processing of a wide range of experiences of exclusion, with a preference for papers which deal with the complex analysis of these experiences from an intersectional perspective.

 

RC05RC38/2
Where are you from? Experiences of exclusion, marginalization and racism. Part II

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC38 Biography and Society [host committee]

Organisers
Helma LUTZ, University of Frankfurt am Main, Germany, Lutz@soz.uni-frankfurt.de, RC05, RC38
Roswitha BRECKNER, University of Vienna, Austria, roswitha.breckner@univie.ac.at, RC38

 

RC05WG02/1
Inequality, racialization/ethnicization, and migration

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations [host committee] and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology

Organisers
Vilna Bashi TREITLER, City University of New York, United States, vtreitler@gmail.com, RC05
Manuela BOATCA, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, manuela.boatca@fu-berlin.de, WG02

Processes of social stratification by class, race, ethnicity, and gender throughout the world have been closely linked to the history of migratory flows to and from particular regions, as well as to the different relations of power between sending and receiving countries. Colonial and imperial rule, economic dependency, political subordination and conflict have therefore not only shaped the racial and ethnic hierarchies, the gender relations, and the class structure of local contexts, but have also decisively influenced the direction and patterns of transnational migration flows, national and regional migration policies, and strategies of incorporation, assimilation, and marginalization of different migrant groups in particular geopolitical contexts.

This joint session is therefore an invitation to examine historical and contemporary processes of racialization, ethnicization, and/or gendering as they relate to transnational and transcontinental migrant flows including the European colonial expansion, the Arab and European slave trade, contemporary forms of labor migration, and transnational care chains. We are especially interested in comparative analyses of patterns of racialization and ethnicization of migrant groups in different settings, and particularly in analyses that focus on the Americas, but all submissions that relate to the session title are welcome.

 

RC05WG02/2
Policies on inequality, racialization/ethnicization, and migration

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations [host committee] and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology

Organisers
Vilna Bashi TREITLER, City University of New York, United States, vtreitler@gmail.com, RC05
Manuela BOATCA, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany, manuela.boatca@fu-berlin.de, WG02

 

RC05WG02/3
Social positioning in comparative perspective

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology [host committee]

Organiser
Manuela BOATCA, Free University of Berlin, Germany, manuela.boatca@fu-berlin.de

 

RC07RC09/1
Globalization, futures of management, and resistance movements. Part I

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research and RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development [host committee]

Chairs
Ulrike SCHUERKENS, Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, France, uschuerkens@gmail.com, RC09
Markus S. SCHULZ, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, United States, isarc07@gmail.com, RC07

What is the future of ‘management’? What forces can counter its appeal of efficiency and push for a democratization of social organization? The notion of management has penetrated ever more social spheres and has embraced the world with an even tighter grip. Management is the central social technology not only in corporations and state administrations but also in unions, universities, charities, leisure organizations, and an increasing number of daily routines. The global discourse of management has spread through academic programs, professional training seminars, organizational strategies, government policies, and self-help literature. The technologies vary as much as the sites of their deployment. Disciplined bodies and knowledge submit to these forms of control. Yet, there is also a diverse array of resistances from individual misbehavior in the workplace to collective counterstrategies by social movements.

Moreover, one of the most important features of organizations in the last quarter of the 20th century has been the increasing influence of management. There has been a spread of management from large corporations into professions, NGOs, the public sector, and everyday life of social actors. The spread of management has meant the spread of the discourse on management. This discourse consists of a given language and given practices that are produced, distributed, and consumed by actors in the global social world. These forms of disciplined knowledge that have contributed to the creation of a world controlled by managers, and technologies of management have penetrated the global discourse of management. This discourse can be found in individual stories, self-help books, training programs, organizational strategies, and government policies. This discourse is so widespread that it seems difficult to escape from its grip. Microforms of resistance in the workplace are today completed by collective strategies of resistance in civil society.

This joint session of RC07 and RC09 invites papers on the multiple forms of resistance against this discourse of management. Authors may present theoretically inspired case studies of public sector employees, unionists, shareholder activists, or other pressure groups. They should ask the question how the global discourse on management is resisted in different situations at work or outside the workplace. This may then permit to demonstrate the variety of counter-hegemonic movements against the management discourse in the global age and its potential influences on our global future. Papers should thus aim to advance our knowledge on these different forms of new social movements that challenge the global management discourse that has shaped the present and will shape the future of our global world.

 

RC07RC09/2
Globalization, futures of management, and resistance movements. Part II

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research and RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development [host committee]

Chairs
Ulrike SCHUERKENS, Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, France, uschuerkens@gmail.com, RC09
Markus S. SCHULZ, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, United States, isarc07@gmail.com, RC07

 

RC07RC23
ICTs for science and technology development in Latin America and the economic South: Present and future

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology [host committee]

Organiser
Jaime JIMENEZ GUZMAN, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico, jjimen@servidor.unam.mx, RC07, RC23


Although it is well documented that ICT’s are not evenly distributed along the world and the development gap between the rich and the poor among and within countries has increased, some advantages have been obtained from the comprehensive use of the technological means to communicate around the world for S&T advancement.

What Latin Americans and the Economic Southerners have to say in terms of possible advantages/disadvantages rendered by the relative easiness to communicate with peers both in the industrialized and not industrialized countries? What can be visualized as the future of these communications? What theoreticians have to say in terms of current and future developments? Is the explosion of ICT’s helping/obstructing our science, technology and innovation? These and many other questions are proposed for exploration. Both personal experiences and theoretical advances are welcome.

The session will be run in both English and Spanish. Since simultaneous translation is not feasible, we ask presenters who can do, to produce slides in both languages. Presentations in one language are welcome. We will arrange the public in such a way that those who speak both languages be seated close to those who don’t for a personal translation.

 

RC07RC48/1
Imagining futures: Social movements, publics, and contentious politics. Part I

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research [host committee] and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Session in English and Spanish

Organisers
Ligia TAVERA FENOLLOSA, Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Mexico, taverafenollosa@yahoo.com
Markus S. SCHULZ, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, United States, isarc07@gmail.com, RC07
Benjamín TEJERINA, University of the Basque Country, Spain, cjptemob@lg.ehu.es, RC48

The Research Committees on Future Research, RC07, and on Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change, RC48, are planning one or more Joint Sessions in English and/or Spanish on contentious politics and on how social movements shape futures. Questions may include (but are not limited to):

 

RC07RC48/2
Imagining futures: Social movements, publics, and contentious politics. Part II

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research [host committee] and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Session in English and Spanish

Organisers
Ligia TAVERA FENOLLOSA, Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Mexico, taverafenollosa@yahoo.com
Markus S. SCHULZ, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, United States, isarc07@gmail.com, RC07
Benjamín TEJERINA, University of the Basque Country, Spain, cjptemob@lg.ehu.es, RC48

 

RC07RC48/3
Imagining futures: Social movements, publics, and contentious politics. Part III

Joint session of RC07 Futures Research [host committee] and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Session in English and Spanish

Organisers
Ligia TAVERA FENOLLOSA, Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, Mexico, taverafenollosa@yahoo.com
Markus S. SCHULZ, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, United States, isarc07@gmail.com, RC07
Benjamín TEJERINA, University of the Basque Country, Spain, cjptemob@lg.ehu.es, RC48

 

RC09RC13RC32
Women, leisure and the family in the age of transformations

Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development , RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC32 Women in Society

Organisers
Ulrike SCHUERKENS, Ecole des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, France, uschuerkens@gmail.com, RC09
Ishwar MODI, International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Laura MARATOU-ALIPRANTI, University of Athens, Greece, lalirpanti@ekke.gr, RC32
Chairs
Angelica WEHRLI, University of Berne, Switzerland, angelica.wehrli@anthro.unibe.ch, RC09
Rudolf RICHTER, University of Vienna, Austria, rudolf.richter@univie.ac.at, RC13
Roberta VILLALON, St. John´s University, United States, villalor@stjohns.edu, RC32

The role of women has become considerably transformed in an age when they are bearing the responsibility of being full-time workers while also being the carers of the home and dependent family members. It is also not uncommon for women to be single parents. How do we then understand the notion of leisure for women? What is the kind of leisure that women, burdened with such responsibilities, can expect? How does family life and individual / personal biographical plans shape women’s understandings and experiences of leisure? How do gender, class, ethnicity/race, ability and age impact on one’s concept of leisure and access to leisure? What does leisure mean and how does access to leisure vary for women in different parts of the world? How does the fact that women enjoy more or less leisure impact on the structure of and relationships within families? Such and other questions are proposed to be examined and discussed from an interdisciplinary perspective in this session.

 

RC09RC18/1
Political inequality outside of the West. Part I.

Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development and RC18 Political Sociology [host committee]

Chair
Joshua Kjerulf DUBROW, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, dubrow.2@osu.edu, RC09, RC18

Political inequality (POLINQ) can be defined as structured differences in influence over government decisions. POLINQ is a multidimensional concept – comprised of voice and response – that occurs in all types of governance structures, from social movement organizations, to local and national governments, on to global governance. Voice refers to how constituencies express their interests to decision-makers, either directly or through representatives. Response refers to how decision-makers act and react to their constituencies, and take the forms of symbols and policy.

While the established literature on other major types of inequality, such as economic and educational inequalities, addresses basic empirical questions of “what are the causes and consequences of this inequality?” and “how does this inequality impact social transformation?”, empirical studies of POLINQ, especially outside of Western countries, are few. As a result, our knowledge of the relationships between political power, political inequality and social and political transformations experienced outside of the West is lacking. Recent events in the Middle East amplify the importance, and urgency, of these issues.

This session seeks empirical (qualitative and quantitative) papers on the topic of POLINQ that feature (a) processes of social and political transformation in (b) countries outside of the West. Comparative studies are strongly encouraged.

Key research questions include:

  1. How do we define and measure political inequality?
  2. How does political inequality differ from democracy and the quality of democracy?
  3. How does political inequality interact with economic, gender, racial, ethnic, educational, and other inequalities?
  4. What are the relationships between political power, political inequality, and social transformations?
  5. How politically unequal are nations outside of the West?
  6. How does social and political change impact political inequality?
  7. What are the consequences of political inequality on peoples, societies and social structures?

 

RC09RC18/2
Political inequality outside the West. Part II.

Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development [host committee] and RC18 Political Sociology

Chair
Joshua Kjerulf DUBROW, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland, dubrow.2@osu.edu, RC09, RC18

 

RC09RC31/1
Migration and development. Part I.

Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development and RC31 Sociology of Migration [host committee]

Chairs
Eric POPKIN, Colorado College, United States, epopkin@coloradocollege.edu
Wade ROBERTS, Colorado College, United States, wroberts@coloradocollege.edu, RC09

Scholarly interest in transnational migration has emerged in the context of the massive population movements that have occurred in the current era of globalization. Changes in the international economy and the diffusion of space-time compressing technologies have created the conditions that intensify exchanges between immigrants and their places of origin. Immigrants pursue either individual or collective relationships with the country of origin for a variety of reasons including difficulty in obtaining economic security in either sending and receiving societies, racial and ethnic discrimination in the host society, and/or a desire to assist in the socioeconomic development of communities of origin often neglected by home governments or destroyed by civil conflict.

Migrant-led transnationalism includes maintaining kinship and social networks across borders, sending or receiving remittances, and the establishment of hometown associations that engage in collective community projects in the home region among other activities. The elaborate linkages between migrant sending and receiving areas that emerge lead some analysts to conceive of transnational migration as a phenomenon that may go beyond individuals and households, incorporating entire communities (migrant and non-migrant members) into the globalization process.

For this session we encourage theoretically orientated case studies or theoretical reflections based on empirical facts linked to the issue of transnational migration and development in the Global South. In particular we are interested in papers that address the issue of remittances, both individual and collective, and what they mean for the transformation of the migrant sending communities. Papers that examine the impact of the current economic downturn on remittances and conditions in sending regions are also encouraged. Finally, papers may consider how hometown associations relate to their interlocutors in the migrant sending communities (local elites, community organizations, local government officials, etc.).

 

RC09RC31/2
Migration in (post-) socialist societies

Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development [host committee] and RC31 Sociology of Migration

Organiser
Angelica WEHRLI, University of Bern, Germany, wehrli@anthro.unibe.ch, RC09

Processes of migration are of longstanding disciplinary and interdisciplinary academic interest. This panel seeks to expand the understanding of migration related processes in (post-) socialist societies. Previously, migration was restricted in most (if not all) socialist societies by strict state regulations and control. Since the fall of the former Soviet Union and the eastern bloc in 1989 many of the former socialist countries as well as some countries that officially remain socialist (e.g. Cuba, China, North Korea or Vietnam) face less state control with respect to migration and thus allow their populations more freedom. While the choice of “free movement” in some countries still heavily depends on the state, others grant their citizens more leeway for self-determination.

The panel hopes to build on empirical data that is theoretically grounded and/or that combines theories of (post-) socialism and migration. We will address the following research questions by relying both on past and current experiences and by pursuing concrete case and country examples. Contributions can focus on the state, the individual or offer a combined approach.

We will inquire into the reasons states encouraged or prevented migration. It is also of interest if these policies are linked with the attempt of states to secure their power in order to prevent social or political unrest (e.g. from ethnic or religious minorities). Papers are encouraged that investigate if, and in what respect, the events of the late 1980’s influenced socialists states’ control of migration on the one hand, and individual choices to migrate out or within their country of origin on the other hand.

In addition we will include perspectives focusing on individuals and their families: How did individual choices to migrate correspond with state regulations? If regulations were restrictive, was it possible to avoid official regulations in order to fulfill the personal wish to migrate and if so what actions were undertaken? If migration was mandated, what kinds of actions were performed in order to avoid a governmental demand to migrate? If an encouraged or forced migration had to be accepted, what experiences did people face? We especially welcome contributions based on Cuba, China, North Korea and Vietnam.

 

RC09RC31/3
Migration and development. Part II.

Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development [host committee] and RC31 Sociology of Migration

Chairs
Eric POPKIN, Colorado College, United States, epopkin@coloradocollege.edu
Wade ROBERTS, Colorado College, United States, wroberts@coloradocollege.edu, RC09

 

RC10RC11/1
Participation and cultural sociology of the life course. Part I

Joint session of RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management [host committee] and RC11 Sociology of Aging

Organisers
Julia ROZANOVA, University of British Columbia, Canada, julia.rozanova@ubc.ca, RC10, RC11
Andreas HOFF, Hochschule Zittau-Görlitz, Germany, ahoff@hs-zigr.de, RC11

The session invites papers that will apply a cultural sociological framework (including theories of Clifford Geertz and Jeffrey Alexander, among others) to studying the culturally constructed self-stereotypes, meanings, and images of aging both within and between different countries, and ways in which meanings of aging may influence physical, mental, and social health at different stages of the life course. The meanings of life course transitions, and the markers of successful passage from one stage of life to the next in the time frame that is considered culturally appropriate are shaping ways in which people conceive of aging. There is emerging research evidence that demonstrates that positive self-stereotypes of aging are associated with better health outcomes in later life; however further research is wanted to uncover ways in which self-stereotypes of aging are formed at different life course stages, and to investigate what health outcomes -- physical, mental, or social -- are influenced by these self-stereotypes the most.

These questions are very relevant as all the societies of the global communities are facing the issues of population aging, with the associated concerns about the need to ensure that the growing numbers of older adults may age in a healthy state and lead lives full of dignity and meaning. Papers in this session will throw light on cultural processes whereby images and self-stereotypes of aging are constructed and impact health in different societies. Both papers that focus on a specific country and those that make cross-cultural comparisons are welcome.

 

RC10RC11/2
Participation and cultural sociology of the life course. Part II

Joint session of RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management [host committee] and RC11 Sociology of Aging

Organisers
Julia ROZANOVA, University of British Columbia, Canada, julia.rozanova@ubc.ca, RC10, RC11
Andreas HOFF, Hochschule Zittau-Görlitz, Germany, ahoff@hs-zigr.de, RC11

 

RC11RC13
Transformation of leisure and ageing perspectives

Joint session of RC11 Sociology of Aging and RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee]

Organisers
Wendy MARTIN, Brunel University, United Kingdom, wendy.martin@brunel.ac.uk, RC11
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Chairs
Wendy MARTIN, Brunel University, United Kingdom, wendy.martin@brunel.ac.uk, RC11
Francis LOBO, Edith Cowan University, Australia, f.lobo@ecu.edu.au, RC13

A number of societies are seeing significant increment in aged populations. Not only is leisure required to cater to their needs but contrarily in some places the perspectives and experiences of senior populations are causing a transformation in the way in which leisure may be viewed. Volunteering activities could be taken as one example. Perspectives of traditional societies with regard to the aged, which are now becoming more available for examination, could contribute significantly to this emerging need. As such, this session aims to draw multicultural and multinational comment on the relationship between leisure and ageing.

 

RC11RC33
Empirical methods in aging research

Joint session of RC11 Sociology of Aging and RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology [host committee]

Chairs
Valentina HLEBEC, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, valentina.hlebec@fdv.uni-lj.si, RC11, RC33
Kathrin KOMP, University of Lethbridge, Canada, kathrin.komp@uleth.ca, RC11

Against the backdrop of aging populations, many researchers, practitioners, and lay-persons ask what aging nowadays entails. They wonder what the characteristics of older people are, how social institutions such as states and families react to aging populations, and how older people themselves perceive aging and their role in society. Aging therefore is a flourishing research topic.

However, scientists who conduct aging research face a series of challenges that are specific to their research topic. For example, how do you collect information among people who might be too frail to answer questions? Another example, how do you measure a concept that changed several times throughout the respondent’s life-course?

This session will address those and related questions. The papers submitted to this session should address questions and challenges that arise when scholars plan and conduct empirical aging research. Examples for possible topics are: Conceptual and empirical papers are both equally welcome.

 

RC11RC41
Demographic challenges associated with aging populations in the developing world

Joint session of RC11 Sociology of Aging and RC41 Sociology of Population [host committee]

Organiser and Chair
Zachary ZIMMER, University of California, United States, zachary.zimmer@ucsf.edu, RC41

The number and proportion of older adults is growing rapidly in many developing countries and regions. These parts of the world are destined to be confronting challenges as a function of their aging populations, particularly when population aging is accompanied by weak formal systems of health and material support. Yet, older populations are still often ignored when it comes to the development of population policy, suggesting a need for research that concentrates on demographic themes of concern to older adults, such as morbidity, mortality, migration and informal support structures. This Session seeks papers that will address challenges associated with aging populations in particular developing countries or regions, or that examine these challenges comparatively across countries.

 

RC13RC14RC23
Leisure and digital transformation: Emerging patterns of communication and electronic community/ El ocio y las transformaciones digitales/ Les loisirs et les transformations numériques

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] , RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology

Session in English, Spanish and French

Organisers
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Christiana CONSTANTOPOULOU, Panteion University, Greece, christiana.constantopoulou@panteion.gr, RC14
Ralph MATTHEWS, University of British Columbia, Canada, ralph.matthews@ubc.ca, RC23
Chairs
Maria Inacia D’AVILA NETO, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, inadavila@gmail.com, RC13
Christiana CONSTANTOPOULOU, Panteion University, Greece, christiana.constantopoulou@panteion.gr, RC14

Application of digital technology in all aspects of human life has not only changed but has actually transformed human life. Digitization, by enabling new types of innovation and creativity in particular domains, has not only revolutionized communication but has also enhanced support to traditional methods. Digital transformation affects not only government, business, mass communication, art or even medicine but also leisure in a significant manner.

Digital transformation not only refers to the concept of `going paperless´ but also visiting places virtually and making use of leisure in manners hitherto unknown and unpracticed. One major consequence of digital transformation is the creation of electronic and virtual communities that have totally changed the character of leisure. The global computer network of the Internet is beginning to make radical changes in the way consumers conduct their economic, social, leisure and professional lives.

This session may also examine that how leading electronic communities that are revolutionizing the way consumers plan vacations, watch sports, find jobs and conduct other key aspects of their lives including leisure. The changes brought about by digital transformation offer not only significant opportunities but also the threats ahead. The session would examine if this revolution is a boon or a bane.

La aplicación de tecnología en todos los aspectos de la vida humana, no solamente, ha cambiado, sino, ha transformado la vida humana. La digitalización ha permitido nuevos tipos de innovación y creatividad a nivel indivudual; así como también, la revolución de las comunicaciones y de los métodos de aplicación de ellas.

La transformación digital no solo afecta a gobiernos, la economía, la comunicación de masa, las artes o la medicina, sino también, al tipo de ocio relizado en la actualidad; visitando, de forma virtual, lugares, por citar solo un ejemplo. Internet está empezando a hacer cambios radicales en la manera en que los consumidores planean vacaciones, miran deportes, encuentran trabajos, y manejan otros aspectos claves de sus vidas.

Los cambios que se están creado ofrecen, no solo, oportunidades, sino también, amenazas. Son estos cambios y potenciales escenarios de transformación que se centrará la presente sesión, con el fin de debatir y analizar los niveles y tipos de oportunidades o desventajas que desprenden las transformaciones digitales antes mencionadas.

L´application de la technologie numérique dans tous les aspects de la vie humaine n`a pas seulement changé, mais a réellement transformé la vie humaine. La numérisation, en permettant de nouveaux types d`innovation et de créativité dans des domaines particuliers, n`a pas seulement révolutionné la communication, mais a également renforcé le soutien aux méthodes traditionnelles. La transformation numérique affecte non seulement le gouvernement,les entreprises, la communication de masse, l`art ou même la médecine, mais aussi de loisirs d`une manière significative.

La transformation numérique ne concerne pas seulement la question de l´abdication du papier , mais met aussi en place la possibilité de rendre visite virtuellement , en faisant usage de loisirs dans les façons jusqu`ici inconnues. Une conséquence majeure de la transformation numérique est la création de communautés électroniques et virtuelles qui ont totalement changé le caractère de loisirs. Le réseau informatique mondial de l`Internet commence à faire des changements radicaux dans la façon dont les consommateurs peuvent exercer leurs droits économiques, sociaux, de loisirs et vie professionnelle.

Cette session peut également examiner la façon dont les communautés virtuelles révolutionnent la façon des consomateurs pour planifier leurs vacances, leurs activités esportives, rencontrent un emploi, et conduisent les aspects clefs de leurs vies, y compris les loisirs. Les changements apportés par les transformations numériques offrent non seulement des opportunités significatives, mais aussi les menaces à venir. La session examinera si cette révolution est une aubaine ou un fléau.

 

RC13RC24/1
Leisure and tourism: Social and environmental concerns. Part I

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC24 Environment and Society

Organisers
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, Jaipur, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Stewart LOCKIE, Australian National University, Australia, stewart.lockie@anu.edu.au, RC24
Tiger WU, Beijing University, China, wubihu.bes@gmail.com

Tourism, a major segment of leisure has taken both enhancing and deleterious forms. Seen as an important part of the millennium Development goals, tourism has proved to be a double edged weapon with some societies benefitting greatly from it while others suffering from cultural depletion due to it. Another aspect of tourism today is the merging of pilgrimage and sacred sites with commercial tourism. How far is this merging beneficial and to what extent does it deplete the sanctity of the sacred sites. A critical examination of the transformation of meaningful cultural forms into performative sites for the pleasure of tourists, especially in traditional societies, would also be encouraged in this session. Besides this, there are significant environmental implications both of leisure and tourism and as such close examination is required of their interface in multicultural and multinational settings.

 

RC13RC24/2
Leisure and tourism: Social and environmental concerns. Part II

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC24 Environment and Society

Organisers
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, Jaipur, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Stewart LOCKIE, Australian National University, Australia, stewart.lockie@anu.edu.au, RC24
Tiger WU, Beijing University, China, wubihu.bes@gmail.com

 

RC13RC30
Leisure, work, time-budgets and the economic crisis

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC30 Sociology of Work

Organisers
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Emilie LANCIANO, University of Lyon, France, emilie.lanciano@univ-st-etienne.fr, RC30
Chairs
Alan LAW, Trent University, Canada, alaw@trentu.ca, RC13
B. GULSHETTY, Gulbarga University, India, drbsgul@rediffmail.com, RC13

In the post modern era where work patterns have changed from clock time to completion of job in one’s own time, leisure and work time budgets have undergone drastic transformations. What is the impact of these on social leisure? Does it mean each having a leisure of his own? Can there be synchronicity of leisure or does it lead to a form of virtual leisure? Questions such as these and how the changing and harder work schedules under the conditions of economic crisis are impacting the patterns of leisure will be the focus of this session in a comparative interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective.

 

RC13RC53
Leisure, democracy and diversity of lifestyles: Children and the youth

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC53 Sociology of Childhood

Organisers
Ishwar MODI, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, RC13
Loretta BASS, University of Oklahoma, United States, lbass@ou.edu, RC53
Chairs
Loretta BASS, University of Oklahoma, United States, lbass@ou.edu, RC53
Fabio LO VERDE, University of Palermo, Italy, floverde@unipa.it, RC13
Gianna CAPPELLO, University of Palermo, Italy, gianna.cappello@unipa.it, RC13

Globalization is making fast inroads into the so called homogenous societies and turning them into heterogeneous ones. As such diversity, as reflected in lifestyles as also an accepted phenomenon, has now become an accepted norm the world over, especially in its urbanized segments. This notion of diversity is further strengthened by the ideal of democracy which has been embraced and upheld by a number of nations the world over. The sections of society which encounter diversity the most and the earliest are children and the youth. They encounter this diversity not only in food, games, dress, language, music and dance, art and culture but also in almost all walks of life which finally finds expression in the practices and the patterns of their leisure. This session aims to examine how leisure and diversified lifestyles impact children and the youth in democratic, non-or-not-so-democratic and undemocratic / dictatorial societies and conversely what kinds of leisure and lifestyles evolve in these varied societies.

 

RC14RC25
Language and discourse in online social media

Joint session of RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC25 Language and Society [host committee]

Chairs
Corinne KIRCHNER, Columbia University, United States, ck12@columbia.edu, RC25
Diana PAPADEMAS, Old Westbury, United States, dianapapademas@verizon.net

Online social media allow horizontal mediated interaction in real time across the world. The technologically-induced capacities and constraints of such interactions are drawing scholarly attention under the concept,"mediatised" communication (July 2011, Language and Communication).

This session explores mediatised language and discourse in the digitised milieu, considered at macro-, meso- or microlevels of analysis. Governments and corporations have new means to control informational content, discourse practices and language use, while their constituencies develop new means of resistance and advocacy. These innovations proceed mainly through language, creating as by-product enormous databases ("corpora") for sociological and linguistic analyses. Visual imagery and photographic presence increasingly factor into online interactions, including creation (often collaboratively, among strangers) of aesthetic, intellectual or politically-directed cultural products.

The suggested topics should stimulate, not limit, the range of submissions:
  1. The social media environment itself merits study, featuring diversity and inequalities: Do online inequalities match social divisions in geographically-circumscribed communities? Traditional bases of unequal access to information technologies might apply -- e.g., financial, disability-related, geographic, age-cohort, linguistic -- while specific parameters change.
  2. Groups and individuals enter communicative contact as never before, requiring new norms of privacy, disclosure, politeness, etc., probably triggered by communicative failures with irreversible serious consequences.
  3. Parallel social media networks reflect linguistic boundaries that are, however, becoming permeable as machine translation improves. Conversely, removing geographic barriers allows scattered small language communities to preserve threatened languages.
  4. For-profit and non-profit groups develop platforms for social media in niche markets. These platforms carry linguistic and discourse constrictions, e.g., short “tweets;” users communicate distinctively, developing "registers" and "jargons."
  5. The social organization of work reflects emerging expertise in the conditions and content of language use online, widely affecting occupational discourse styles and status-rankings -- journalists to political organizers to humanists, etc.
  6. New conditions of language use infringe on traditional linguistic authority (arbiters of "correctness"), accelerating linguistic change.
  7. The conditions of online conversations (anonymity; disembodied conversation partners ; misperceptions of alter`s characteristics) affect discourse styles, in ways needing documentation.

 

RC14RC33
Videography and the analysis of visual knowledge and culture

Joint session of RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology [host committee]

Chairs
Christiana CONSTANTOPOULOU, Panteion University, Greece, christiana.constantopoulou@panteion.gr, RC14
René TUMA, Technical University Berlin, Germany, rene.tuma@tu-berlin.de
Hubert KNOBLAUCH, Technical University Berlin, Germany, hubert.knoblauch@tu-berlin.de

The last decades have witnessed a `visual revolution´. Visual technologies have become part of the everyday life of more and more people who are not only audiences, but also producers. Particularly the availability and omnipresence of video recordings has transformed everyday culture as well as actors’ knowledge. At the same time, sociology and the social sciences around the globe are developing methods for the analysis of audio-visual data.

One the one hand audio-visual data allows the researchers to capture, store and analyse visible conduct in a variety of settings. Videographic studies have been undertaken in e.g. workspaces, education, museum studies and vernacular communication. The methods for studying visible conduct aim especially at reconstructing the communication processes in which actors render visible their visual knowledge. The analysis of video data will, therefore, be one of the foci of the session.

On the other hand also video recordings generated by the actors come into focus, be it recordings of private events like weddings as well as recordings of political events that are circulated via YouTube and Wikileaks etc. and the methodical approach to this other form of visual data will be discussed.

The aim of this session is to bring together researchers that either present methodological, methodical questions or exemplary empirical analyses related to video analysis, visual knowledge, culture and communication. Finally, other visual forms of knowledge, such as photography or diagrams, shall be addressed in this session.

We invite sociological and social scientific papers on recent methodical or methodological questions or empirical findings that address questions of the analysis of visual data in the field of visual knowledge and culture.

 

RC15RC19/1
Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part I

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health [host committee] and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy

Organisers
Ellen KUHLMANN, University of Bath, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk
Claus WENDT, University of Siegen, Germany, wendt@soziologie.uni-siegen.de

Better healthcare for all citizens is a key strategy to fight social inequality and poverty and high on the agenda of policy-makers across the globe. Besides many differences, emergent healthcare systems in the southern and eastern hemisphere as well as established welfare states in the west all seek to improve the organisation, delivery and accessibility of healthcare and the management of professionals and services. For these processes social responsibility and public sector services have been proved to be crucial for the health of the population, but markets and management enjoy high currency in the current climate of financial restrictions.

In our session we plan to provide a platform for discussing the following questions: How to get health reform right, and how to balance public responsibility for healthcare and markets? How to balance global challenges and local needs and demand? What can be learned from local solutions to global pressures? What to learn from international experiences, especially taking into account transformations and emergent healthcare systems in the Americas and other regions of the world that are broadly neglected in comparative health policy. We invite papers that explore these issues either across nations and regions or in a single country.

 

RC15RC19/2
Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part II

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee]

Organisers
Ellen KUHLMANN, University of Bath, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk
Claus WENDT, University of Siegen, Germany, wendt@soziologie.uni-siegen.de

 

RC15RC19/3
Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part III

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee]

Ellen KUHLMANN, University of Bath, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk
Claus WENDT, University of Siegen, Germany, wendt@soziologie.uni-siegen.de

 

RC15RC19/4
Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part IV

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health [host committee] and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy

Ellen KUHLMANN, University of Bath, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk
Claus WENDT, University of Siegen, Germany, wendt@soziologie.uni-siegen.de

 

RC15RC52/1
Professional governance and health human resource management: The challenges of equality, diversity and inclusion. Part I

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups [host committee]

Ellen KUHLMANN, University of Bath, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk, RC52
Ivy BOURGEAULT, University of Ottawa, Canada, Ivy.Bourgeault@uottawa.ca, RC15

The professions are the backbone of the healthcare system and key to sustainable healthcare services for all citizens. Yet the governance of the professional workforce faces a number of challenges. On top of this, shortage and inefficient use of health human resources together with changes in the composition of the professional workforce by age, gender and citizenship create an urgent need for policy interventions. Within this scenario the health professions gain significance not only as an `object` and problem of governance, but also as a source of innovation and a facilitator of change in the healthcare sector.

This session brings together two strands of the debates: the governance of the health professional workforce and the management, planning and policy of health human resources. We seek to explore, among other things, whether and how a more diverse and integrated professional workforce, including gender equality, may contribute to more sustainable healthcare services that, in turn, improve social justice.

 

RC15RC52/2
Professional governance and health human resource management: The challenges of equality, diversity and inclusion. Part II

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health [host committee] and RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups

Ellen KUHLMANN, University of Bath, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk, RC52
Ivy BOURGEAULT, University of Ottawa, Canada, Ivy.Bourgeault@uottawa.ca, RC15

 

RC17RC33
Organizations and mixed methods: Possibilities and requirements of a meso-level sociology

Joint session of RC17 Sociology of Organizations and RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology [host committee]

Chairs
Kathia SERRANO, Universität Heidelberg, Germany, kathia.serrano@soziologie.uni-heidelberg.de
Cristina BESIO, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, cristina.besio@tu-berlin.de
Robert SCHMIDT, robert.schmidt@soz.tu-berlin.de

Organizations are a complex and hybrid social phenomenon at the meso-level. They are characterized by internal decision-making processes which are guided and constrained by formal structures such as memberships, procedures and roles, but also by discourses, routines and informal dynamics of power. Moreover, they are not isolated units, but rather embedded in wider social contexts and environments which influence them and which they shape in return.

While there are some efforts to grasp this complexity in organizational theory by developing organizational models which also encompass the cultural and societal dimension of the organization (e.g. in neo-institutionalism, structuration theory or systems theory), the field of organization studies is dominated by empirical studies which focus on only individual or limited facets of the phenomenon.

This is also due to the fact that different methodological approaches are seldom combined. Thus, quantitative surveys of a specific type of organization or of organizations in a specific environment are only loosely connected to the numerous “thick” qualitative descriptions of organizational structures and processes available in case-studies concerning single or few organizations.

Beyond triangulation, mixed-methods-designs not only try to increase validity of the analysis, but integrate multiple perspectives to draw a more accurate picture of phenomenons in social life. In case of organizations we think that strengthening the links between different methods would contribute to a better informed understanding of the organization as a whole and of the variety of organizational forms.

At the same time, the organization could be a privileged object of study for a thread of methodological research which tries to combine methodological approaches, in particular the formerly considered contrary qualitative and quantitative paradigms, into new forms of epistemologically grounded research designs.

The session aims to explore possible combinations of methods in order to design multilevel analyses of modern organizations. Papers for this session should therefore address one or more of the following questions: Papers debating general methodological questions and papers discussing specific forms of mixed-methods-designs to inquire organizations in a specific research project are both equally welcome.

 

RC17RC52
Globalisation and its impacts on professions and organisations

Joint session of RC17 Sociology of Organizations [host committee] and RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups

Organisers
Daniel MUZIO, United Kingdom, d.muzio@lubs.leeds.ac.uk, RC17
Ellen KUHLMANN, United Kingdom, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk, RC17

Globalisation has certainly exercised a deep impact on professional occupations, organisations and their work. The rise of the global professional service firm (GPSF), employing thousands of professionals in dozens of jurisdiction and generating multi-million pound profits, is one of the most notable expressions of this. Another important example is the emergence of broadly similar models of organising the public sector and the professions, like the ‘new public management’ paradigm. At the same time, professions have played a growing role in facilitating processes of economic globalisation providing the knowledge, systems and practices that may support global capitalism but also local elites.

Particularly interesting here has been the active role played by professional organisations and occupations in lobbying for regulatory changes in the way that markets are structured and business is conducted within developing economies. Professions are also driving public sector reforms that are modelled upon global concepts of modernisation attempting to improve social justice and democratisation. This session seeks to draw our attention to a number of key issues relating to the remodelling of professional occupations and organisations through the lens of globalisation.

 

RC20RC24WG02
The sociogenesis of environmental injustice and inequality in Latin America: Historic-comparative sociological approaches

Joint session of RC20 Comparative Sociology , RC24 Environment and Society and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology [host committee]

Languages: English, Portuguese and Spanish

Organisers
José Esteban CASTRO, Newcastle University, United Kingdom, j.e.castro@ncl.ac.uk
Gustavo ANTON, National University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, gustavoanton1976@hotmail.com
Lorena BOTTARO, National University of General Sarmiento, Argentina, lbottaro@ungs.edu.ar

Expressions of environmental inequality and injustice in Latin America take many forms, from the “fumigated towns” in regions taken over by intensive agriculture and the poisoning of soil and water by open cast mining to the violent displacement of populations to build large-scale infrastructure works and the development of business activities. There is by now a wealth of interdisciplinary research that systematically documents the scale and extension of these problems, from Mexico to Patagonia. This session aims at looking at this mounting evidence on environmental injustice and inequality from a historic-comparative sociological perspective, bringing together theoretical approaches and empirical evidence. It will explore such issues as the interweaving of social and environmental inequality and injustice in development policies, the weight of the environmental dimension in Latin American sociology, or the continuities and ruptures identifiable in Latin American politics in relation to environmental inequality and injustice.

 

RC21RC24
Cities and climate change

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development [host committee] and RC24 Environment and Society

Organisers
Louis GUAY, Laval University, Canada, louis.guay@soc.ulaval.ca
Pierre HAMEL, University of Montreal, Canada, pierre.hamel@umontreal.ca

Why and how have large cities, in the North and South hemispheres, taken up the challenge of climate change? Not long ago most of them thought that climate change was the responsibility of national governments and the international community, but attitudes and actions have changed and more and more cities are involved in climate change policy and initiatives.

The purpose of this session is to examine, comparatively, research on urban regions’ response to climate change. Many aspects can be looked at. Firstly, there are the likely social impacts of a warming world on large cities. Urban populations can be differently affected by climate change impacts; for instance new inequalities can arise owing to warmer environments. Secondly, reactions and responses may differ greatly. What is the role of urban governments; what actions are selected and in interaction with whom? Thirdly, how do civil society and social movements take part in an urban policy on climate change?

Finally, urban governance is very often inserted in a web of multi scalar governance: what is the role, if any, of higher tiers of government in climate change policy?

The session is open to research done not only on mitigation measures, but also, and even more so, on adaptation planning. We would like to focus on the contribution of social movements and civil society to climate change policy (claim-making, issue and response-framing, mobilizations, institutional participation, etc.) and on the issue of social and environmental justice (vulnerable urban social groups) with regards to the debate on climate change and its impacts on city

 

RC21RC31
Migration, migrants and the development of inclusive urban cultures and identities

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development and RC31 Sociology of Migration [host committee]

Organisers
Marco MARTINIELLO, University of Liège, Belgium, m.martiniello@ulg.ac.be
Yuri KAZEPOV, University of Urbino, Italy, yuri.kazepov@uniurb.it

In many multicultural migrant and post-migration cities, similar contradictory trends can be observed in the field of cultures and identities. On the one hand, the pull towards segregation, exclusion, discrimination and ethno-national withdrawal is undeniable, though it may vary from country to country and from city to city. On the other hand, the pull toward residential integration, co-inclusion, cultural encounters, cultural métissage is just as undeniable, though it may seem on the wane compared with the last decade in the 20th century.

In order to make sense of these observed contradictory trends, the session will explore discourses, policies and practices in the local artistic field of post-migration multicultural cities by addressing the following questions: how do cities construct diversity discourses and policies? How do migrants and following generations mobilize in the local artistic scene? What type of collective identities (post-colonial, religious, trans-ethnic, religious, etc.) and ethnicities are publicly expressed and constructed in the field of arts? Are immigrant and ethnic artists and productions supported by official cultural institutions? Are local cultural policies becoming multicultural? How do migrant and ethnic artist mobilize in order to change cultural policies? What is the contribution of policies and practices in the local artistic field in contrasting inequalities and poverty in multicultural settings/neighbourhoods in an innovative way? etc.

The session clearly combines top-down and bottom-up perspectives from a variety of large, mid-size and small cities across the globe and welcomes papers addressing the issues comparatively or on the basis of single case studies.

 

RC21RC43/1
Housing and the right to the city. Part I

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development [host committee] and RC43 Housing and Built Environment

Organisers
Manuel B. AALBERS, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, m.b.aalbers@gmail.com
Kenneth GIBB, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom, Ken.Gibb@glasgow.ac.uk

In recent years responses to neoliberal urbanism and social injustice have been framed in terms of “the Right to the City”, both by academics and social movements. Academics and groups associated with this movement seek to increase social justice, push democratization, and promote empowerment. As always, housing plays a central role in these urban struggles, although it has received comparatively little attention in the academic debate on the Right to the City.

This panel seeks to bring together a number of supporters and supportive critics of a Right to the City perspective on the 21st century housing question on both developed and developing countries. We are interested in case studies of housing struggles from around the globe that are framed within a Right to the City approach as well as in more conceptual and critical contributions.

We also welcome presentations that deal with a critical assessment of social/housing movements that work under the banner of the Right to the City. In particular papers should address questions like:
a) How useful is the concept for increasing social justice in housing?
b) And how useful is it as an academic concept?
c) Has current use trivialized and corrupted Henri Lefebvre’s concept, as Marcelo Lopes de Souza argues?
d) Is a rights-based approach more promising than exclusion-based, relational and other approaches to housing need?

Comparative papers are also particularly welcome.

 

RC21RC43/2
Housing and the right to the city. Part II

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development [host committee] and RC43 Housing and Built Environment

Organisers
Manuel B. AALBERS, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, m.b.aalbers@gmail.com
Kenneth GIBB, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom, Ken.Gibb@glasgow.ac.uk

 

RC21RC43/3
Housing and the right to the city. Part III

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development and RC43 Housing and Built Environment [host committee]

Organisers
Manuel B. AALBERS, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, m.b.aalbers@gmail.com
Kenneth GIBB, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom, Ken.Gibb@glasgow.ac.uk

 

RC21RC47
Urban movements in the new metropolitan context

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development and RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements [host committee]

Organisers
Pierre HAMEL, University of Montréal, Canada, pierre.hamel@umontreal.ca
Fernando DIAZ ORUETA, University of La Rioja, Spain, fernando.diaz@unirioja.es

It seems that the diversity of urban movements has increased a great deal over the last thirty years. This could be explained among other things by the expansion and fragmentation of urban landscape in reference to the emergence of ‘new metropolises’.

To what extent are urban movements able to challenge and/or adjust their actions to these urban forms? For example, do their interventions are increasingly articulated to multi-scalar politics that are accompanying metropolitan governance? In that respect, to what extent one can say that their current mobilizations are moving beyond the localism that have often characterized their engagement in the past, as this was often criticized for limiting their political impact? Is it possible to relate urban mobilizations to issues of social justice and democratization? Do urban movements create innovative forms of internal organization?

This panel will explore the new forms of social mobilization that urban movements are defining in different social, cultural, economic and political contexts. The particular conditions created by the global economic reorganization will be especially considered.

 

RC22RC33/1
Qualitative methods in the sociology of religion. Part 1

Joint session of RC22 Sociology of Religion and RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology [host committee]

Chairs
Eloísa MARTIN, University of Brasilia, Brazil, eloisamartin@hotmail.com
Bernt SCHNETTLER, Universität Bayreuth, Germany, schnettler@uni-bayreuth.de
Regine HERBRIK, Technische Universität Berlin, regine.herbrik@tu-berlin.de

Presently, the `return of religion` is intensely discussed among scholars. This includes the public face and the social forms of contemporary religion as well as its individual dimension. Over the past years, we are witnessing a growing number of empirical studies all over the world concerned with religious phenomena. However, most of these studies employ quite conventional methodology. Therefore, the session will focus on qualitative methods for studying religious phenomena.

We encourage participants to present papers concerned with methodological questions related to the specific problems of empirical research in the Study of Religions.

This includes a discussion of appropriate and effective methods for researching religion and may encompass a critical discussion of methodological issues concerning qualitative inquiry in the field of religion, e.g. can we transfer methods from other fields of re-search to the sociology of religion or do we need special, field-specific methods? What can we learn from methods used in neighbouring disciplines? Which sets of methods can be recommended for empirical analyses targeting micro-macro issues in understanding religion? What role does the gender issue play in this?

We are especially interested in papers reporting empirical research finding in the sociology of religion using qualitative research methods in combination with methodological reflections.

The topics include: religious experience; spirituality; the transformation of contemporary religion; religion in the public sphere and the impact of religion on private life; religion and emotion; religion, migration and ethnicity; social memory and religious identities; the changing role of religious organization; religion, communication, and media; and dynamics and transformation of beliefs.

 

RC22RC33/2
Qualitative methods in the sociology of religion. Part 2

Joint session of RC22 Sociology of Religion and RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology [host committee]

 

RC23RC32
Gender, science and technology: Post-colonial and feminist perspectives

Joint session of RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology and RC32 Women in Society [host committee]

Organisers
Laura CORRADI, University of Calabria, Italy, laura.corradi@unical.it
Josephine BEOKU-BETTS, Florida Atlantic University, United States, beokubet@fau.edu

Post-colonial feminist perspectives on gender, science, and technology accommodate a vast array of disciplines and contesting perspectives. Essentially, the interconnectedness of racism, colonialism and globalization, and their impact on women and gender, set a context for understanding the concerns, priorities, and contributions of post-colonial feminist scholars regarding the democratization of science and technology– from the rejection of a widely assumed neutrality to the active deconstruction of male scientific imaginary and practice, based upon a hierarchical opposition between science and nature. Post-colonial feminists have long questioned the aims and methods taken for granted in a white, male, upper-class scientific community which used to enjoy colonial privileges – and successfully unveiled the power relations underlying scientific knowledge, in terms of class, race, gender and sexuality.

This session will discuss the meanings and understandings post-colonial feminism brings to the subject of gender, science, and technology. Questions to consider include: Has the ‘critical mass’ of women in the scientific professions been achieved? How do women in scientific careers locate themselves in relation to science and its practice? How can women change the directions of science and technology? What about the different feminist standpoints, politically and ethically, on hot issues such as nuclear energy, genetically modified seeds and embryos, military research and nano-biotech? In an era of growing economical and environmental crises, what are the priorities, the criteria, the objectives? How can social scientists contribute to this discourse, in terms of a re-definition of a socially useful science and technology?

 

RC23RC48
Democratising science and technology through protests and mobilizations for social justice

Joint session of RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology [host committee] and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Organiser and Chair
Binay Kumar PATTNAIK, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India, binay@iitk.ac.in

Modern Science and technology as social institutions have been elitist compared to other forms of community based, traditional sciences and technologies. Often the latter are treated as indigenous forms of S&T. Such rich traditions that are embedded in socio-cultural systems cannot be treated as mere trash or superstitions. Because these too have been empirically founded, developed through trial and error method and hence have been carriers of some form of verifiable wisdom and experiences. Besides, these too have been found to be socially and culturally more appropriate to certain people/ communities, occupationally and physically non-displacing and ecologically sound. Such traditional and alternative forms of sciences and technologies need recognition and these have often raised their voices for their inclusion and due recognition, meaning, to be in par with modern Science and Technology. This of course means increasing democratization of the institution of modern Science and technology. Thus by being more inclusive S&T would be more democratized and would imbibe spirit social justice of a certain kind.

These voices of protests have been heard in both developed as well as developing countries. This process of democratization refers to the Science, technology and civil society interface areas where civil society agents mostly NGOs/ activist organizations/ intellectuals as pressure groups have influenced policies and shaped the growth of S&T in certain domains. Their mobilizations have been seen to be for protection of indigenous knowledge systems /indigenous technological practices, protection of people against testings of new drugs/ pharmaceuticals, instruments of fertility/ sterility, varying applications of new technologies of ICT type/ Nano technologies, etc in relation to human health.

Similarly in the area of agriculture voices have been raised for maintaining farmers’ rights over seeds, maintaining bio-diversity, traditional varieties of crop species and cropping patterns, etc. Further the impact of bio-technology products on human health and ecology have been severely contested in recent times in different parts of the developing world where NGOs have taken the lead.

All these protests of above kind have been seen as mobilizations both at ground level as well as at the discursive level. And hence these mobilizations have taken the shape of various forms of sustainable/ appropriate/ alternative technology movements, peoples’ science movements, science popularization movements, anti-science movements, anti-ecological movements (targeting epistemological foundation of S&T), anti-globalization movements (of particular kind, involving local/ traditional knowledge systems).

 

RC24RC44
Trade unions in the green economy

Joint session of RC24 Environment and Society and RC44 Labor Movements [host committee]

Chair
David UZZELL, University of Surrey, United Kingdom, d.uzzell@surrey.ac.uk Organizers
Jacklyn COCK,Witwatersrand University, South Africa, Jacklyn.Cock@wits.ac.za
Nora RATHEL, Umea University, Sweden, nora.rathzel@soc.umu.se
David UZZELL, University of Surrey, United Kingdom, d.uzzell@surrey.ac.uk

We propose a session to discuss the different ways in which trade unions across the world are responding to the challenges of climate change. The effects of climate change are being felt globally, but as the International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) has written “The main victims of climate change will be the workers, in particular in developing countries, whose sole responsibility will be to have been born poor in the most fragile parts of the planet.” Being in Latin America gives us the opportunity to invite scholars and trade unionists from Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and Brazil, where trade unions have been building alliances with environmental movements, trying to find a common agenda to combat climate change and create jobs. The Rio 20+ Earth Summit in Rio will have taken place at the beginning of June 2012. This session would also be an opportunity to discuss what the conclusions of the Earth Summit mean for the trade union movement. Climate Change is one of the major global justice issues in which trade unions are engaged, demanding a “Just Transition” to a “Green Economy”. So far there is very little scholarly and public discussion about their practices, and perspectives.

 

RC24RC47
Climate justice, “buen vivir” and voluntary simplicity: New lifestyles and political commitments

Joint session of RC24 Environment and Society and RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements [host committee]

Session in English and Spanish

Organisers
Geoffrey PLEYERS, Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium, geoffrey.pleyers@uclouvain.be
Stewart LOCKIE, The Australian National University, Australia, stewart.lockie@anu.edu.au

Across the world, social actors are showing growing concern about global warming and environmental devastations. While international institutions seem unable to cope with these challenges, grass-roots actors and activists’ networks are mobilizing support for a global agreement aiming at environmental protection and are developing alternative practices and visions of the world. The concept of ‘buen vivir’ illustrates the notable contribution of Latin American indigenous communities to the debate. In Europe and North America, citizens have appropriated alternative lifestyles, consuming less natural resources. This panel will focus on citizens’ initiatives and social movements envisioning to deal with environmental issues both by developing alternative lifestyles and promoting active participation in public debates.

 

RC25RC32
The role of language in shaping gender justice and sexual rights movements

Joint session of RC25 Language and Society [host committee] and RC32 Women in Society

Organiser
Melanie HEATH, McMaster University, Canada, mheath@mcmaster.ca

What is the importance of language in shaping gender justice and sexual rights movements in the 21st century? How do discourses concerning race, class, age and other minority statuses affect the formation of coalitions in such movements? What role does language and culture play in creating and breaking down obstacles to the goals of attaining gender justice and sexual rights? Finally, what is the place of identity in movements relating to sexuality, gender, the family, and relations of intimacy? Papers investigating gender justice and sexual rights movements may incorporate a number of methodologies, such as frame analysis, conversation analysis, feminist analysis or Critical Discourse Analysis. Topics may include but are not limited: movements relating to gender equality, same-sex partnership and parenthood, lesbian, gay and bisexual rights, human trafficking, transgender rights, sex work, sex tourism, adolescent sexuality and child abuse.

 

RC25RC54
Empowerment, language and the body

Joint session of RC25 Language and Society [host committee] and RC54 The Body in the Social Sciences

Organisers and Chairs
Celine-Marie PASCALE, American University, United States, pascale@american.edu
Bianca Maria PIRANI, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy biancamaria.pirani@uniroma1.it

This panel will explore discourses on the body and empowerment:
1. How discourses of construct, reproduce and contest particular conceptions of empowerment relative to the body.
2. How discourses of embodiment construct, reproduce and contest particular notions of power.

We are particularly interested in papers that explore identity formation and empowerment through analyses of language and representation and which address possibilities for social change. Analyses may include any variety of cultural, historical and political spheres. Themes for paper submissions may include but are not limited to:

 

RC30RC44
Innovative approaches to informal work

Joint session of RC30 Sociology of Work and RC44 Labor Movements [host committee]

Organisers
Rina AGARWALA, Johns Hopkins University, United States, agarwala@jhu.edu, RC44
Klaus SCHMIERL, klaus.schmierl@isf-muenchen.de, RC30

Since the 1980s, informal or precarious work has been steadily increasing in both rich and poor countries. Much has been written about this trend. Some decry it as an affront to labor security, welfare and justice. Others celebrate it as an opportunity for unshackled economic growth and entrepreneurship. Deep questions remain, however, on how workers, states, capital, and international agencies are addressing the changes arising from this trend.

How are unprotected workers fighting to retain their basic welfare? How are states responding to the shifting demands of unregulated, informal workers? Are employers benefitting from the rise of precarious employment? How are international agencies redefining labor surveys to include and standardize the increasingly diverse forms of informal work at the global level?

This panel invites papers that shed light on the multitude of approaches workers, states, and employers have taken to address the challenges of increasing informal work. Papers may highlight national or intra-national cases. Papers covering cases in the global North and/or in the global South are welcome.

 

RC31RC55/1
Migration and quality of life. Part I

Joint session of RC31 Sociology of Migration and RC55 Social Indicators [host committee]

Organisers
David BARTRAM, University of Leicester, United Kingdom, d.bartram@le.ac.uk
Sergiu BALTATESCU, University of Oradea, Romania, bsergiu@uoradea.ro

Migration is typically a means by which migrants attempt to improve their quality of life (and/or that of their families). What does “quality of life” mean for migrants, i.e., to what extent and in what ways does that concept hold different meanings for migrants relative to natives and to governments in the receiving countries? Under what conditions do migrants end up succeeding in improving their lives via migration? What factors impede their efforts in this regard? Are there already or should be designed and implemented policies that would increase migrant’s well-being? How can we measure the impact of these policies? Which social indicators should be used for the field of migrant’s well-being?

The “Migration and quality of life” is a session of RC55 (Social Indicators) and RC31 (Sociology of Migration) that aims at deepening sociological knowledge on the migration situation and policies while contributing to conceptualization and development of social indicators for this particular area. Organizers seek to attract papers that give systematic consideration to the meaning and determinants of “quality of life” and “well-being” among migrants, as well as to the public policies in this field.

Drawing on the increasing tendency among sociologists to rethink/transcend conventional and sometimes unexamined assumptions about quality of life (in part as a consequence of the rapidly growing interest in “happiness studies”), we also look for case studies or comparative papers that will make a base for a global awareness of the problems of migrant’s well-being. Papers exploring normative/ethical questions relating to migrant situation and/or link individual action in this field with problems of social justice and democratization are also very welcomed.

 

RC31RC55/2
Migration and quality of life. Part II

Joint session of RC31 Sociology of Migration and RC55 Social Indicators [host committee]

Organisers
David BARTRAM, University of Leicester, United Kingdom, d.bartram@le.ac.uk
Sergiu BALTATESCU, University of Oradea, Romania, bsergiu@uoradea.ro

 

RC32RC44
Challenging the logic of neoliberalism: Labor-feminist coalitions and work-family policy campaigns

Joint session of RC32 Women in Society and RC44 Labor Movements [host committee]

Organisers
Ruth MILKMAN, The City University of New York, United States, rmilkman@gc.cuny.edu
Linda CHRISTIANSEN-RUFFMAN, Saint Mary´s University, Canada, lindacruffman@yahoo.ca

In an era when government regulation and state-sponsored safety nets are under attack worldwide, one of the few areas in which new initiatives have been successful is work-family policy. In Australia, universal paid family leave was established in 2011. Even in the U.S.– long an extreme laggard in this area – several state and local governments have established new programs guaranteeing paid family leave or paid sick days to workers. The U.S. and Australian programs have incorporated principles of gender equity from the start; indeed they came into existence in large part due to the efforts of advocates for women, in partnership with organized labor.

By contrast, in many of the countries that established such paid leave programs in earlier eras, gender equity was often absent; indeed in some cases only mothers were eligible for such leaves. Yet in the neoliberal era, even as other social programs have been cut back, many countries have reconfigured their parental leave programs with the aim of making them more gender-egalitarian.

This session will include papers from selected countries to explore the implications of these recent developments in a comparative perspective, with an emphasis on the role of labor movements as well as the impact on gender relations.

 

RC33RC41
Methodological challenges and alternatives to census taking in small island developing states

Joint session of RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology [host committee] and RC41 Sociology of Population

Chair
Godfrey St. BERNARD, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago, gstbiser@gmail.com

For the purposes of this panel, census-taking refers specifically to the conduct of population and housing censuses. Despite their small land area and population size, small island developing states (SIDS) continue to experience formidable challenges that could negatively impact their census-taking operations. At the same time, some islands have embraced progressive thrusts and have embarked upon novel strategies deemed to be worthwhile lessons for others.

The Session aims to explore novel methods and techniques that have been embraced in SIDS to enhance the quality of census-related services, inputs and outputs. In essence, this Session seeks papers that treat with is-sues that would redound to enhancing the quality of census-related services and data, the latter being of critical importance, whether in the context of metadata, raw data or statistical facts. Papers treating with con-ceptual and interpretive dimensions that impact the analytical processes in national census-taking are also en-couraged.

Whether in the context of the Caribbean, the South Pacific, the Mediterranean, the Indian Ocean or elsewhere, SIDS have encountered numerous experiences with administrative, technical and dissemination functions that impact the quality and efficiency of census-taking outcomes. These experiences have been manifest in the form of challenges and remedial strategies proposed by official statisticians and academicians.

Thus, the Session strives to stimulate discussion and where appropriate, debate emergent issues that redound around technological advancement and more sophisticated administrative and technical systems that render traditional systems less efficient.

Altogether, a wide array of professionals with interests in the consumption and production of census data are encouraged to submit abstracts of papers that will discuss and debate these issues in the context of SIDS. From geographic and socio-economic standpoints, SIDS are similar except for country-specific idiosyncrasies. Nonetheless, the session hopes to assemble contributions from prospective panellists covering all geographic regions that contain SIDS.

 

RC33WG02
Process-oriented methodology and theories in historical and comparative sociology

Joint session of RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology [host committee]

Organiser
Fumiya ONAKA, Japan Women’s University, fonaka@fc.jwu.ac.jp

Process-oriented methodology has become very popular in today’s sociology (e.g. ‘process of democratization’ , ‘social justice process’ , ‘decolonialization process’). It has been pointed out that there are close relations between the nature of data and theories in process-oriented methodology, and that ‘process-generated data’ are more important for these process-oriented theories than research-elicited data, on which most sociologists have been relying. Then the next question is, what kind of theories are appropriate for those process-generated data?

This is the topic we should like to discuss in this session. The process-oriented approach has been related to various theories, such as postcolonial theory, biographical and life course theory, cultural and social memory, discourse theory and framing, figurational and process sociology, network theory, rational choice theory, salience theory, social class and social inequality, symbolic cultural theory, value theory, world systems theory, globalization theory, modernization theory, differentiation theory, individualization theory, and so on. We welcome papers discussing the merits and demerits of some of these theories from the viewpoint of ‘process-generated data’ or ‘process-oriented methodology’ in general.

 

RC36RC48/1
From alienation to empowerment Part I

Joint session of RC36 Alienation Theory and Research [host committee] and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Organiser and Chair
Martin PROSONO, Missouri State University, United States, mprosono@missouristate.edu, RC36

It has long been evident that domination fosters resistance. But what forms of domination foster resistance, and how does resistance become expressed? Sexual repression, for example, has had a long tradition of fostering underground movements and practices, especially in liminal times/zones. Political repression has led to passive accommodation and ressentiment toward those in power, but, as Nietzsche argued, such ressentiment ultimately serves to render those who are dominated passive and thereby reproduce their domination. The slave mentality thus sustained slavery. In the contemporary world, as traditional structures of domination are being questioned and/or are being eroded, we see a variety of social mobilizations that would challenge alienation and powerlessness. These range from feminism and gay rights to the Arab Spring and social justice movements. This session will focus on the means by which people move from being passive in the face of domination to being agents who seek social transformation.

 

RC36RC48/2
From alienation to empowerment Part II

Joint session of RC36 Alienation Theory and Research [host committee] and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change

Organiser and Chair
Tova BENSKI, College of Management Studies, Israel, tovabenski@gmail.com

 

RC47RC48
New trends and theoretical approach in the field of social mobilizations and social change

Joint session of RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change [host committee]

Organisers and Chairs
Antimo L. FARRO, University of La Sapienza, Rome, Italy, antimoluigi.farro@uniroma1.it
Benjamín TEJERINA, University of the Basque Country, Spain, cjptemob@lg.ehu.es, RC48

The aim of this session is to reflect about specific case-studies that have been analysed through theoretical frameworks that try to go beyond current theories usually applied in the field of collective action and social movements. In special, we are looking for works that (a) combine different theoretical perspectives in an original way, (b) compare different researches and offer new interpretations of highly studied phenomena and (c) analyse new forms of mobilization that question the current frameworks. We are not looking for a bibliographical discussion of basic theories to spot their insufficiencies. Our objective is to look for new theoretical interpretations supported by a solid and structured analysis of empirical available –and specifically compiled- evidences.

 

RC48TG05
Visual representation of injustice and exclusion

Joint session of RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change [host committee] and TG05 Visual Sociology

Organisers and Chairs
Piotr SZTOMPKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland, ussztomp@cyf-kr.edu.pl and Małgorzata BOGUNIA-BOROWSKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland, mbogunia@poczta.onet.pl

The images have a strong persuasive power, not only because of what they show (R. Barthes’ ‘studium’), but becuase of their direct, performative impact on the viewer (R. Barthes’ ‘punc tum’). This latter function has been widely used for mobilizing popular activism, either in intentional ways in social or political visual campaigns or as an unintended side-effect of pictures loaded with meaning, producing bolts of conscience (E. Durkheim) or emotional repulsion . The theme of injustice and exclusion has been particularly relevant in human society from the time immemorial. And because of the very nature of the phenomenon, as always related to the subjective feeling of relative deprivation, it has always been more responsive to the immediate, direct experience, whether actual or virtual (by means of images), than to the fact-oriented textual accounts.

The goal of the session is to discuss how this direct, performative and persuasive function of images of injustice and exclusion, provided by film, photography and the media, has contributed to the mobilization of protest events, contestation, social movements and perhaps even revolutions. Historical examples are abundant; enough to mention Civil Rights Movement in the US, or Solidarność Movement in Poland, but also the feminist movement, movements for minority rights (ethnic, or sexual , or religious) trade-union activism and others. Weren’t visual messages important in the current wave of revolutions in the Near-East? In all these and similar cases the demonstration effect has played a powerful role, either by means of images showing human degradation, humiliation, loss of dignit and poverty, or the reverse, showing unjustified affluence, unimaginable riches and conspicuous life-styles (T.Veblen), and raising ‘why-not-myself?’ type of questions.

Has this role changed with the ‘visual turn’, when the iconosphere, as well as the media (including the Internet) are so saturated with images as never before? Aren’t we emotionally insulated from images of injustice and exclusion when they are so abundant and pervasive? Is the persuasive impact of images changing with the evolving substantive and esthetic styles, more and more shocking and brutal (a good example is the evolution of the World Press Photo contest over the last decades)? Isn’t a „boomerang effect” (R.Merton and P.Kendall) observable in this area, leading to the feeling of hopelessness, helplessness and resulting passivism? How to overcome this dilemma? Could we articulate some suggestions as to the most effective visual means for the mobilization of activism in the name of justice and inclusion?

These are just some issues we would like to address in the session. We believe that approaching them in historical as well as cross-cultural perspective may be particularly fruitful. For example we could ask how various epochs differ in the use for visual, mobilizing tools, and perhaps more provocatively, do various contemporary cultures attach various role to images, iconosphere and visual messages, do they differ in the subjects, aeasthetic styles, ethical emphases. The Forum provides particularly good opportunities for cross-cultural comoparisons, and more generalized serendipities.

We expect both theoretical contributions, semiologic analysis of selected images, and concrete, empirical studies of film, photography and the media, by means of comparative, qualitative methods: content analysis, case study, photo-elicitation (projective techniques), focus groups, amateur visual documents and others. Visual illustrations for presentation at the session are of course most welcome.

 

TG03TG04
Risk, human rights and global justice

Joint session of TG03 Human Rights and Global Justice [host committee] and TG04 Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty

Organiser and Chair
Edward SIEH, Lasell College, United States, esieh@lasell.edu

Old and new threats have once more shown that ‘risk’ is a moralizing statement (Rigakos and Law, 2009). On a global scale ‘risk’ is used to justify political measures whether to invade another country or to suppress democratic movements. Ulrich Beck suggested once that a new threat such as international terrorism or climate change could support the development of a cosmopolitan society. In political practice the power to define risk is often used to justify injustice.

The key question at this time is how risk and human rights are entangled in respect to terrorism, economic development, distribution of resources or social national and international social inequalities. What are the major threats? What are the short-term and long-term implications? Will some segments of the population disproportionately find themselves permanently targeted for undeserved treatment? Have we entered a period of such great social instability that demands for survival overtakes the fear of diminished rights and freedoms and even duties? Is there stable definition of risk that allows for consideration of when risk no longer exists? In the time of neoliberal society will the rich be able to live above any concern for their rights as they are increasingly isolated from the main concerns of everyday life?

 

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International Sociological Association
March 2012