Second ISA Forum of Sociology, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1-4 August 2012

Research Committee on
Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations, RC05

  on-line programme

Main theme

Constructions of contemporary racisms, social inclusion and democratization

 

Programme Coordinator

Ann DENIS, University of Ottawa, Canada, adenis@uottawa.ca

RC05 Liaison in Argentina
Anahí González, Universidad de Buenos Aires, anahipgonzalez@gmail.com

Volunteer at the venue
Lucila Rotger, lurotger@gmail.com.

Deadlines

All Forum participants (presenters, chairs, discussants, etc.) need to pay the early registration fee by April 10, 2012, in order to be included in the programme. If not registered, their names will not appear in the Programme or Abstracts Book.

Sessions

provisional as of March 15, 2012, in alphabetical order

 

Contemporary Racisms on traditional (print) and new (web) media

This session will focus on contemporary racisms and explore how these are expressed through traditional (print) and new (web) media.This session will present theoretical and empirical papers to contribute to a discussion about contemporary racisms as these processes occur in traditional - print - and new social media - Facebook, MySpace, Twitter and YouTube etc.. Papers in this session show that contemporary racism continues to be expressed through traditional print media. In addition, papers showcase web based media have been used to espouse old and generate newer forms of racisms.

 

Contemporary Racisms, Problematic Positionalities and Marginalised Voices: The Methodological Challenge

This session focuses on the methodological dilemmas and innovations arising in the exploration of the multiplicitous, intersecting, and often contradictory dynamics and transformations around racialisation, marginalisation and social change, and the issues relating to the politics of knowledge implicated in such research. Narrative, participatory and arts-based research have become common practices employed to elicit and work from the array of grounded personal and creative forms of expression to more effectively inform and deconstruct both academic and policy discourses. Such methods often centre on the notion of "giving voice to" - or "writing into being" - those whose experiences and stories have been silenced and disenfranchised in historical and contemporary discursive, institutional and social landscapes. Despite the longstanding traditions of these methodological practices, both pragmatic challenges and philosophical debates relating to the politics of interpretation, representation, translation and power relations underpinning the research process remain central and defining issues. Papers in this session reflect on these challenges across an array of studies exploring the cultural politics of identities.

 

Del Sistema de Consulta de Organizaciones Indígenas y Conflictos Étnicos en las Américas (SICETNO)

 

Democracies in transition: The political cultures of excluded groups (gender, race, ethnicity)

Democracy in nation-states around the globe faces the challenge of incorporating differentiated citizenships as a result of protest and social mobilization. By the same token, the emergence and spread of a great variety of expressions of political culture from below (excluded minorities) have found numerous ways to articulate their socio-cultural demands and political goals. The session invites papers that address the various forms in which excluded and marginal groups are becoming visible in the political arena and how their demands are articulated and processed by the state institutions and large society. The session welcomes theoretical input on democracy, minorities and excluded peoples, and empirical cases addressing the relevance of gendered race/ ethnicity in advancing inclusive and pluralistic democracies.

 

Diaspora and ethno-national conflict

This session will focus on the way in which ethnic and national identity are revived and translated by diasporic groups, and how such revival and translation practices of diasporas enable, shape or even dislodge belonging ties with the previous home. What impact do these have on ethno-national relations in the newly acquired home? For example, do diasporic translations of ethnic and national demands further reify ethnic and national identities and tensions? Or, do they facilitate newly defined ethnic boundaries as well as flexible and hybrid identities? Moreover, how do diasporic revivals and translated representations foster interactions with other diasporic groups in the new home, and also with the host community?

We invite papers which discuss issues of belonging, ethnic and national identity, transnationalism, and diaspora.

 

Hybridity, border crossings and indigenous knowledges

A key facet of social justice and democratisation requires that we understand how indigenous knowledges are situated and enacted in contemporary social life; how indigenous knowledges intersect and contribute to hybrid forms of social identities and movements; and importantly, whether these alternate knowledges and hybrid forms can traverse established socio-cultural boundaries – affecting transformative acts with perhaps broader implications. These lines of inquiry direct us to the overlap between indigenous knowledges, hybridity and border crossings in society – where a multi-faceted understanding of variable social identities and agency may be found.

The session invites original papers – theoretically informed discussions and case-studies – that address the above theme. We particularly encourage contributions from young scholars and scholars from Central and South America.

 

Inclusion and Exclusion in Ethnically Diverse (Non-settler) Societies

This session includes papers that examine ethnically diverse societies that we would not classify as having been created predominantly by "settlers," - i.e., an indigenous population plays an important sociological role in the nation. The session's papers interrogate the inclusion/exclusion of groups that might be labeled by their ethnicity/race/nation of origin/immigrant status/aboriginal origins or other characteristics or categories. It includes work that contrasts dominant group(s) with other ethnic groups, or that compares ethnically diverse "non-settler" societies to other societies.

 

Indigeneity, autochthony and the politics of belonging

This session will examine the tension between the rights-claiming notions of belonging to particular territory and its exclusionary/racist connotations in different historical contexts and different power relations among indigenous people, hegemonic majorities and (im)migrants.

We encourage analyses about colonial settler societies, Western Europe and ethnic/national conflict zones: in all cases there may be claims of ‘we’ve been here before you’, ‘we belong here and you don’t’, ‘you’re contaminating/diluting/ our cultural/national essence’ which have different dynamics but use similar ideological claims.

 

Inequality, racialization/ethnicization, and migration

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations [host committee] and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology
Processes of social stratification by class, race, ethnicity, and gender throughout the world have been closely linked to the history of migratory flows to and from particular regions, as well as to the different relations of power between sending and receiving countries. Colonial and imperial rule, economic dependency, political subordination and conflict have therefore not only shaped the racial and ethnic hierarchies, the gender relations, and the class structure of local contexts, but have also decisively influenced the direction and patterns of transnational migration flows, national and regional migration policies, and strategies of incorporation, assimilation, and marginalization of different migrant groups in particular geopolitical contexts.

This joint session is therefore an invitation to examine historical and contemporary processes of racialization, ethnicization, and/or gendering as they relate to transnational and transcontinental migrant flows including the European colonial expansion, the Arab and European slave trade, contemporary forms of labor migration, and transnational care chains. We are especially interested in comparative analyses of patterns of racialization and ethnicization of migrant groups in different settings, and particularly in analyses that focus on the Americas, but all submissions that relate to the session title are welcome.

 

Leisure, urbanization, migration and ethnic relations

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations , RC13 Sociology of Leisure [host committee] and RC21 Regional and Urban Development
The postmodern context of urbanization and migration has become a part of life. The stresses and strains caused by intermingling have resulted not only in new forms of leisure that create an enabling environment for integration and comfort but also possibilities for inter-cultural exchange (including ethnic and racial dimensions) as new entrants introduce the modes of thought and leisure that they bring with them. Tension and/or conflict are also possible outcomes. The aim of this session is to draw together researchers with various sub-disciplinary specialities to examine these phenomena.

 

Memoria indígena: ¿Otra dimensión de las luchas políticas actuales de los pueblos originarios de Latinoamérica?

 

Policies on inequality, racialization/ethnicization, and migration

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations [host committee] and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology
This joint session is an invitation to examine historical and contemporary policies on inequality, race/racialization, and migration as they relate to transnational and transcontinental migrant flows including the European colonial expansion, the Arab and European slave trade, contemporary forms of labor migration, and transnational care chains. Policy making has a great role in perpetuating social stratification by class, race, ethnicity, and gender; and colonial and imperial rule, economic dependency, political subordination and conflict have shaped racial and ethnic hierarchies, gender relations, and class structures of local contexts; and each of these have strong influences upon the direction and patterns of transnational migration flows, national and regional migration policies, and strategies of incorporation, assimilation, and marginalization of different migrant groups in particular geopolitical contexts.

 

RC05 Business Meeting

 

Researching racism and nationalism in an increasingly challenging academic environment

In this session we invite offers of papers focusing on the politics of research in a changing academic environment (`universities in crisis`) and the impact that this has, or is likely to have, on sociological research on race and racism. We would especially like the session to explore the limits (and possibilities) of individual and collective agency on the part of sociologists in the pursuit of (greater) empowerment, ‘social inclusion’ and social justice for those who are currently denied them.

 

Social inclusion (or its absence) in settler societies

This panel presents work that interrogates the inclusion/exclusion within settler societies of groups that might be labeled by their ethnicity/race/nation of origin/immigrant status/aboriginal origins or other characteristics or categories. Included are papers that contrast the dominant group(s) in a settler society with other groups, and those that compare settler societies to one another on the basis of their inclusion and/or exclusion.

 

Social positioning in comparative perspective

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and WG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology [host committee]

 

The ethics of intersectional politics and the challenges to alliances and coalition building in and outside academe

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC32 Women in Society [host committee]
What are the ethics of intersectional politics and alliance building? What are the do’s and don’ts of being an "ally"? Taking as point of departure Crenshaw’s pioneering analysis of political intersectionality, or how competing single-issue politics erase particular individuals and groups, foregrounding certain forms of ‘problems’ and ‘victims’ over others, the session will deal with the ethics and potentials of intersectional politics, and the challenges of building alliances and coalitions between distinctive social movements, which have different social justice agendas that are often organized around competing single issue/identity claims, in particular antiracism, feminism and gay and lesbian activism. Central to our discussions will be a) the adverse effects of the partitioning of political space and civil society around single issues, despite loud declarations of commitment to diversity and multiple issues by many organizations and movements, and b) how the ways in which debates and problems are framed and organizations structured lead to various forms of exclusions and silencing through denial, displacement, misidentification, tokenism and cooptation.

 

Violencia e interculturalidad / Violence and interculturality. Part I

La violencia es un fenómeno intrínseco e inevitable a las sociedades humanas, no obstante, los tipos de violencia que se presentan en el mundo social pueden reflejar y representar las formas de organización social, política y económica que existen. Dichas formas de violencia nos dan cuenta de las repercusiones que tiene cada organización de gobierno, por lo tanto da cuenta de la manera en la que los grupos humanos y las personas dialogan, comunican interactúan entre sí. La interculturalidad, como principio de diálogo y convivencia, buscaría precisamente moldear los tipos de violencia que existen per-se para generar espacios de diálogo comprensión y entendimiento del otro. Lo anterior no se plantea como un espacio de reconocimiento del otro (multiculturalismo) sino como comprensión del otro a partir de espacios de interacción (interculturalidad). ¿Cuáles son las formas de violencia que existen, cómo se dan éstas, y de qué manera el diálogo entre las culturas generaría espacios de interlocución más harmoniosos? Este será el propósito de nuestra mesa, pensando en todos las formas posibles que generan violencia, y la manera en la que el dialogo intercultural las moldea, y las tranforma.

Violence and interculturality
Violence is an intrinsic and inevitable phenomenon in societies. Nevertheless, the types of violence that appear in the social world can reflect and represent the forms of social, political and economic organization that exist. Such forms of violence make us realize the repercussions of government organization, including the way in which different groups and individuals talk, communicate and interact among themselves. Interculturality, as a beginning of dialogue and coexistence, considers how to mold the types of violence that exist in order to generate spaces for dialogue, comprehension and mutual understanding. Rather than constituting a space of recognition of the other (multiculturalism), interculturality aims at the understanding of others by offering spaces for interaction. But what are the forms of violence that exist? How do these happen? How might dialogue among cultures result in spaces for more harmonious dialogue? This will be the issue on the table: thinking about all the possible ways in which violence is generated, and about the ways in which intercultural dialogue molds and transforms it.

 

Violencia e interculturalidad / Violence and interculturality. Part II

See above

 

Where are you from? Experiences of exclusion, marginalization and racism. Part I

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations [host committee] and RC38 Biography and Society
In these joint sessions we intend to explore from a (micro) sociological perspective how people deal with experiences of exclusion, marginalisation and racism. In many countries all over the world the composition of citizens is now including a variety of ethnic and racial backgrounds. The question ‘Where are you from?’ addressing the descent of ‘another one’, can be considered as expression of innocent true interest and empathy. However, the question itself always carries unintended connotations and is embedded in power relations and ethnic/ racial hierarchies; it can, therefore, be understood as discursive tool of ‘doing othering’.
We wish to invite scholars’ contributions to a debate on the biographical processing of a wide range of experiences of exclusion, with a preference for papers which deal with the complex analysis of these experiences from an intersectional perspective.

 

Where are you from? Experiences of exclusion, marginalization and racism. Part II

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC38 Biography and Society [host committee]

 

 

Top     

isa logo
International Sociological Association
November 2012