Second ISA Forum of Sociology, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 1-4 August 2012

Research Committee on
Sociology of Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy, RC19

  on-line programme

Programme Coordinators

Camila ARZA, Latin American School of Social Sciences, Argentina, arza@flacso.org.ar
Daniel BELAND, University of Saskatchewan, Canada, daniel.beland@usask.ca

RC19 Liaison in Argentina
Mónica Clot, Asociación Argentina de Sociología and Universidad de Buenos Aires, monicaclot@yahoo.com.ar

Volunteer at the venue
Andrea Schenk, schenk.andrea@yahoo.com.ar

Deadlines

All Forum participants (presenters, chairs, discussants, etc.) need to pay the early registration fee by April 10, 2012, in order to be included in the programme. If not registered, their names will not appear in the Programme or Abstracts Book.

Sessions

provisional as of March 15, 2012, in alphabetical order

 

Basic universalism: Is Latin America getting closer or further away?

Under which conditions does the region´s “star” antipoverty program, Conditional Cash Transfers, set the stage for basic universalism and expanded social rights, and not minimum safety nets aimed exclusively at the “deserving poor”? Invoking a comparative perspective, both intra regional and across the global South, this session looks at a broad set of social, political and economic determinants of anti-poverty policy development in countries with and without legacies of robust social policies, currently run either by the moderate left, the radical left, or the right.

Sponsor: Comparative Research Programme on Poverty (CROP)

 

Comparative social assistance models

 

Economic development and the role of social policy: Latin America and East Asia

Social policy has been an integral part of the developmental process in many Latin American and East Asian countries. Latin American countries introduced modern social insurance programmes much earlier than their East Asian counterparts. What are the differences and similarities in the nexus of economic and social development between the experiences of these two regions? What are the impacts of democratization and neo-liberal market reforms on social policy in the two regions? How do they differ?

In recent years, East Asian economies such as (South) Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore have established more comprehensive welfare states while Latin American countries like Brazil, Chile and Argentina have tried to extend the reach of social policy to their most vulnerable citizens.

What are the differences and the similarities between these two regional trends? Despite the theoretical significance of such issues, there has been little comparative research on social policy in these two regions. For this session, we invite papers that compare social policy and economic development in East Asia and Latin American countries. Papers that cover one region only are also welcomed. Our aim is to start innovative and collaborative dialogues among East Asian and Latin American scholars for future comparative research on social policy reform.

 

Gender and family policy

 

Global social policy

 

Keynote lecture

 

Models of social assistance in Latin America

In the last decade and a half, Latin American countries have expanded their social assistance programs. Large scale tax financed programs providing direct transfers to households in poverty address the deuda social. There is diversity in program design and objectives, from non-contributory pensions, to child allowances, to human development conditional transfer programs. Their development raises important question for the region. What factors explain this ‘reconnecting’ with poverty? What will be their impact on existing welfare regimes? Will they take us closer to eradicating extreme poverty?

 

Panel discussion: The quality of social policy: Explaining cross-national and sub-national differences

 

Poverty and social policy in Latin America

 

RC19 Business Meeting

 

Social policy in Latin America. Part I

 

Social policy in Latin America. Part II

 

Social protection for older adults in Latin America and beyond

 

The politics of welfare policy in Latin America

 

The uneasy relationship between CCTs and universalism in Latin America

 

Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part I

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health [host committee] and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy
Better healthcare for all citizens is a key strategy to fight social inequality and poverty and high on the agenda of policy-makers across the globe. Besides many differences, emergent healthcare systems in the southern and eastern hemisphere as well as established welfare states in the west all seek to improve the organisation, delivery and accessibility of healthcare and the management of professionals and services. For these processes social responsibility and public sector services have been proved to be crucial for the health of the population, but markets and management enjoy high currency in the current climate of financial restrictions.

In our session we plan to provide a platform for discussing the following questions: How to get health reform right, and how to balance public responsibility for healthcare and markets? How to balance global challenges and local needs and demand? What can be learned from local solutions to global pressures? What to learn from international experiences, especially taking into account transformations and emergent healthcare systems in the Americas and other regions of the world that are broadly neglected in comparative health policy. We invite papers that explore these issues either across nations and regions or in a single country.

 

Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part II

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee]

 

Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part III

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee]

 

Towards better healthcare for all: What matters in the transformation of healthcare systems and policy. Part IV

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health [host committee] and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy

 

Transnational actors and processes in social policy: Latin America and beyond

Over the last two decades, much has been written about the role of transnational actors and processes in social policy development. This session focuses on these factors and their potential impact on national and sub-national social policy developments in Latin America. More specifically, the session raises the following questions: what is the relationship between national and transnational actors in social policy development? Do transnational actors have the capacity to shape country-level policy outcomes? How do international organizations involved in social policy development collaborate with, or fight against, national policy actors? What is the impact of transnational actors and processes on specific episodes of policy change? How do transnational policy networks change over time, and what are the consequences of such change on policy country-level policy development. The session focuses primarily on Latin America but papers on other regions of the world that make a direct contribution to the general study of transnational actors and processes in social policy are also welcomed.

 

 

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November 2012