XVII ISA World Congress of Sociology, Sociology on the move, Gothenburg, Sweden, July 2010

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Joint Sessions

 

Congress Programme

Sessions descriptions

RCO1/RC13 [host committee]
Leisure and tourism: Harbinger of peace and conflict resolution

Joint session of RC01 Armed Forces and Conflict Resolution and RC13 Sociology of Leisure
Organizers: Giuseppe Caforio, CEMISS, Italy, gcaforio@fastwebnet.it, Ishwar Modi, India International Institute of Social Sciences, Jaipur, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in and Jan te Kloeze, Foundation WICE – DSL, The Netherlands, jantekloeze@hetnet.nl
Tourism which has become a well accepted and world wide form of leisure can make important inputs into cross cultural understanding. Seeing people – how they live, their achievements, and their environments – can lead to experiences that would generate mutual respect and fellow feeling. Much of the conflict in the world may be a result of lack of knowledge about the ‘other’. Tourism organizers – governments, companies, local group – have an interest in creating safe places for people to visit. Consciously planned tourism can enable people to experience other cultures and not merely be voyeurs from the outside. Scholars have begun to trace the role of businesses and civic organizations in mitigating conflict. Through this call we hope to highlight research that examines the direct or indirect impact of tourism on conflict resolution and peace building

RC02/RC23 [host committee] 
Science, technology and innovation in cities and regions
Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: RC23 Maarten Mentzel, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, mentzel@uva.nl, and RC02 Anup Dash, Utkal University, India, dashanup@hotmail.com
Housing, real estate, infrastructures and labor markets in urban areas are severely affected by the global financial crisis. All are under intense pressure. Threats and opportunities compete with each other. Which particular research, technology and innovation policies are appropriate in these circumstances? Which development strategies and transformations will be favorable or relevant? At the same time is the question: who is to gain, whose city is at stake? The time horizon also comes in: how about short-term policy options vs long-term policy consequences? We would welcome both empirical and theoretical research, as well as papers focused on comparative urban analysis.

RC02/RC25 [host committee] 
Language and the economy

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society and RC25 Language and Society
Organizers: Ilkka Arminen, University of Tampere, Finland, ilkka.arminen@uta.fi and Jo Armstrong, Lancaster University, UK, j.e.armstrong@lancaster.ac.uk
“Microsocial” structures and relationships are what instantiate some of the most globally extended economic fields and institutions - for example, global financial markets. The new economic sociology maintains that economy is based on social actions. This viewpoint makes relevant cultural, sequential, semiotic and linguistic analysis of economic activities. This session invites scholars who analyze economic actions and transactions sociologically taking into account cultural, sequential, semiotic and linguistic composition of actions. The contributions are invited from perspectives, such as performativity of economics, rhetorics of economy, sequential organization of economic transactions, actor-network configurations of economy, economy as a global conversation, attempts to discuss micro foundations for macro (economic) structures and boundaries between economy and socio-semiotic sociology, e.g. behavioral economics (Akerlof), cognitive institutionalism (North).

RC03 [host committee]/RC18
Social capital, political and civic participation, and electoral systems

Joint session of RC03 Community Research and RC18 Political Sociology
Chair: John Sudarsky, Colombia, johnsudy@unete.com

RC03/RC21 [host committee]
The Impact of im/migration on urban culture, public arts and public space

Tuesday, July 13, 20:00-22:00
Joint session of RC03 Community Research and RC21 Regional and Urban Development
Organizers: Jerome Krase, Brooklyn College The City University of New York, USA, JKrase@brooklyn.cuny.edu and Timothy Shortell, Brooklyn College The City University of New York, USA, shortell@brooklyn.cuny.edu
How have urban culture, public arts and public space changed as a consequence of the influx of new and different groups into cities around the world? Included in these new and different groups is the development of "life style" neighborhoods such as those of Gays and Lesbians as well as those of international migrants. One might also consider how the enrichment of urban cultures will suffer as a consequence of the burgeoning global financial crisis as some groups leave, and others become even more marginalized. For example one can see in New York City an increase in the number of "homeless" Latin American migrants who once flocked to the city to work in disappearing low-paid service jobs. Similar processes of social and economic adjustment are taking place in Chinese cities such as Shenzhen and can be connected to anti-migrant violence in South Africa where migrants had taken over spaces vacated by South African citizens in the most marginal of townships. This session provides opportunity for presentations diverse in both subject and format.

RC04/RC13 [host committee]
Leisure and education

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC13 Sociology of Leisure
Organizerss: Ishwar Modi, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, Ari Antikainen, University of Joensuu, Finland, ari.antikainen@joensuu.fi, & A. Gary Dworkin, University of Houston, USA, gdworkin@mail.uh.edu
Interface between leisure and education can hardly be overemphasized, more so in a fast moving world where there is no time for reflection. For improving the quality of life, leisure education is essential. Leisure modes themselves can become a medium of education, leading to excellence and innovation in performance. As such should leisure be left to evolve and manifest on its own or should it be subtly guided? Need for active interface between leisure organizations and educational institutions requires exploration.

RC04/RC23 [host committee]
Changing forms of university-society relationship. Part I

Joint Session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: RC23 Juha Tuunainen, Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland, juha.tuunainen@helsinki.fi, and RC04 Raj P. Mohan, Auburn University, USA, mohanrp@auburn.edu
The latter part of the 20th century witnessed a radical transformation in the ways in which the relationship between science, university and society was understood. The linear model of innovation and the related traditional contract between science and society was challenged. Global economic competition, increasingly complex societal problems and changes in public policy-making have all contributed to alterations in the social roles and responsibilities of academics, universities and science. In science and technology studies, for instance, the increasingly important role of science in economy has been discussed in terms of commercialization of research results, changing norms of science and emergence of the so-called entrepreneurial university. Another line of research has attempted to redefine the nature and types of contemporary scientific research under such headings as Mode 2 knowledge production and post-normal science. In addition, some scholars have paid attention to the changes in public-policy making, or focused on technological risks and ethical issues that are becoming increasingly important topics in societal decision-making. Still another group has addressed the role of scientists as advisors and experts in the context of jurisdiction and other forums of public policy formation. Finally, within the sphere of public understanding of science, the focus of study has shifted towards democracy of science and the increasing importance of citizens.

From the public policy perspective, universities have been regarded as central contributors in innovation, economic growth and competitiveness of nations. Simultaneously, social accountability pressures towards science and universities have mounted. An example of this trend is the introduction of the so-called third mission of the university into the university law, as well as development of related systems of indicators by which the social impact of university activities are measured. The aim of this session is to uncover the variety of mechanisms and institutions through which university-society interaction takes place in different disciplines and fields of research activity. By so doing, the session seeks to contribute to our understanding of the democracy of science, the societal role of university research as well as evaluation of the university’s third mission activities.

RC04/RC23 [host committee]
Changing forms of university-society relationship. Part II

Joint Session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: RC23 Juha Tuunainen, Department of Sociology, University of Helsinki, Finland, juha.tuunainen@helsinki.fi, and RC04 Raj P. Mohan, Auburn University, USA, mohanrp@auburn.edu

RC05/RC13 [host committee]/RC31
Migration, leisure and community cohesion

Joint session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations, RC13 Sociology of Leisure, and RC31 Sociology of Migration
Organizers: Ishwar Modi, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in (RC13), Peter Ratcliffe, University of Warwick, UK, Peter.Ratcliffe@warwick.ac.uk (RC05), and Marco Martiniello, FNRS and University of Liège, Belgium, m.martiniello@ulg.ac.be (RC31).
Large scale migrations taking place due to various social, geo political and economic reasons are causing problems of lack of community and social cohesion and ethnic harmony. Migrants often face jealously, resentment, and competition from local people. Cultures and customs of migrants are often seen with suspicion arising from inherently insular motives. Can leisure become a bridge between the communities local and migrant? Can expressions of leisure become a platform for ethnic harmony, community cohesion and understanding?

RC05/RC31 [host committee] 
New theories of ethnicity in migration and post-migration situations

Joint Session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC31 Sociology of Migration
Organizers: Marco Martiniello, President of RC31, FNRS and University of Liège, Belgium, M.Martiniello@ulg.ac.be and Peter Ratcliffe, President of RC05, University of Warwick, UK, Peter.Ratcliffe@warwick.ac.uk
This session will examine the most recent attempts to advance theories of ethnicity in migration and post-migration situations throughout the world. Do the changes in migration patterns cause changes in ethnicity formation? Conversely, does the dynamics of ethnicity cause new forms of migration? Scholars interested in theory development in the area of ethnicity and migration are invited to debate these difficult questions.

RC05/RC32 [host committee]
Confronting the politics of racialized sexualities: On regulating minority gender relations and sexualities

Joint Session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Sirma Bilge, Université de Montréal, Canada, sirma.bilge@umontreal.ca andPaul Scheibelhofer, Central European University, Hungary, scheibelhofer_paul@phd.ceu.hu
Questions of gender and sexualities are essential to understand politics of race and nation at different levels of analysis, whether the local, the national, or the global. 
Drawing on what David Goldberg called the ‘liberal paradox’, i.e. how the commitment of modernity to idealized principles of liberty and equality goes hand in hand with a multiplication of racialized identities and the sets of exclusions they prompt and rationalize, enable and sustain (Goldberg 1993), the proposed session will tackle the ways in which ethnocultural exclusion and racialization processes in western liberal democracies currently operate through the problematization of minority/migrant gender relations and sexualities. We are particularly interested in the current mobilizations of women’s rights and gay rights to construe the ‘civilized’ space of western freedoms and their ‘enemies’. Besides the critique of these exclusionary discourses and practices, we welcome contributions engaging with questions of resistance/emancipation and counter-hegemonic practices, and providing frameworks for developing knowledge that lessen domination.  

Identified thematic areas for papers include but not limited to:

RC05 [host committee]/RC32  
Sites of conflict and cooperation: Women at the intersection of ethnicity, nation and citizenship

Joint Session of RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Rhoda Reddock, University of the West Indies, Trinidad and Tobago, rreddock@cgds.uwi.tt  and Ann Denis, University of Ottawa, Cananda, adenis@uottawa.ca
While a great deal of recent emphasis has been placed on the situation of new migrants to metropolitan centres, there are continuing stories of the impacts of older migrations – forced and assisted, which occurred in earlier phases of capitalist colonial expansion.  This panel will explore the situation in specifically post-colonial multi-ethnic plantation societies which trace their population diversity to the labour demands of an expanding trade in plantation products especially through British colonial and capitalist expansion. Countries such as Fiji, Guyana, Sri Lanka, South Africa, Malaysia, Singapore and the entire Caribbean share this history and legacy of British colonialism, forced labour systems, large-scale labour transportation and immigration, multi-ethnicity and the plantation.  Contestations over ethnicity, identity and citizenship characterise many of these societies and some have been the site of ongoing or recent violent conflict.  How are these societies located in the emerging scholarship on intersectionality and post-coloniality, and what new insights can gender analysis bring to our understanding of the history, current context and future of these societies? As feminists how can we learn from each other in addressing this problematic yet exciting legacy?  

RC05 [host committee]/RC38
Roundtable on ‘the role of transnational public intellectuals’

Joint sessionof RC05 Racism, Nationalism and Ethnic Relations and RC38 Biography and Society
Organizers: Helma Lutz, University of Frankfurt, Germany, Lutz@soz.uni-frankfurt.de, RC05 and Kathy Davis , Utrecht University, Netherlands, Kathy.Davis@let.uu.nl and Helma Lutz, RC 38
The role of transnational public intellectuals is currently a ‘hot issue’ in sociology. Michael Burawoy, who is known for his work on global ethnographies (and is now a member of the ISA Board) will be formally invited to join the debate. We also invite researchers from RC 05 (for example, looking at the impact of their own work on public discourse) and RC 38 (on the role they see for biographical research in various public and political debates) to join the roundtable.

RC06/RC13 [host committee] 
Leisure and the family in contemporary society

Joint Session of RC06 Family Research and RC13 Sociology of Leisure
Organizer: Ishwar Modi, President of RC13, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in and Rudolf Richter, President of RC06, University of Vienna, Austria, rudolf.richter@univie.ac.at
Family is undergoing drastic changes the world over. This is equally true both for its structure and functions. Structurally speaking the number of nuclear and single parent families is increasing. These changes are leading to not only a reduction of the family’s leisure functions but also leading to many stresses and strains impacting both children and parents. The leisure functions hitherto performed by the family have been taken over by other social and commercial organizations thus leading to a dilution of the cohesiveness of the family. Focus question: Can leisure be a medium for the reinstatement of family solidarity?

RC06 [host committee]/RC30
Men, work and parenting

Joint Session of RC06 Family Research and RC30 Sociology of Work
Organizers: Linda L. Haas, Indiana University, USA, lhaas@iupui.edu and Margaret O'Brien, University of East Anglia, UK, M.O-brien@uea.ac.uk
For most men, paid work and family caregiving are important sources of identity and personal satisfaction.  According to the social constructionist perspective on gender, how men combine employment and family responsibilities reflects assumptions and norms in the gendered social institutions of family and work.  Within the family, women are expected to have more responsibility than men for caregiving and men are assumed to be less capable caregivers.  In the workplace, companies have assumed that workers are unencumbered by family responsibilities, rendering men’s caregiving invisible at work.  For gender equality to be reached, cultural beliefs, public policies and workplace practices must support a presumption of shared care, whereby men are regarded as capable, willing and involved family caregivers as women.
Papers that address linkages between men, work and family are invited for this session.  Possible topics include: men's constructions of caring; effects of public policy on men's ability to combine paid work and family caregiving; impact of employment on men's caregiving; men’s strategies for work-family harmonization; men’s breadwinner attitudes and behavior; men’s work and family tradeoffs; effects of overload and overwork on men’s relationships in families; impact of caregiving on men’s employment; men’s use of workplace or government policies designed to facilitate combining work and family; characteristics of father-friendly workplaces; the fatherhood “wage premium.” Papers that include diversity by race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, marital status and social class as well as those that cover more than one society are especially sought.  Proposals should be sent to both organizers. 

RC06/RC30 [host committee]
Parental leave: International comparisons

Joint Session of RC06 Family Research and RC30 Sociology of Work
Organizer: Tremblay Diane-Gabrielle, RC30, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada, tremblay.diane-gabrielle@teluq.uqam.ca
Papers on programs of parental leaves in different countries, including maternity and paternity leave are invited. Papers should ideally focus on international comparisons of benefits, length of leaves, challenges and differentiated impacts on careers of men and women who take parental leave. Linkages between work, family and parental leave, as well as sharing or caring during parental leave will also be of interest. Analyses of different perceptions regarding possibility to take parental leave, between men and women, or between parents and non parents in the labour force will also be of interest. Finally, since the division of labour between men and women is related to parental leave, it is also interesting to analyse the possible link between division of labour within the couple and the length of leave of each parent. Papers on other issues related to parental leave are also welcome, particularly those which might have to do with societal norms and the gendered social institutions of family and work.

RC06/RC31 [host committee]
Diversity of transnational families

Joint Session of RC06 Family Research and RC31 Sociology of Migration
Organizers:   Loretta Baldassar, University of Western Australia, Australia, baldassa@cyllene.uwa.edu.au and Laura Merla, University of Lisbon, Portugal and University of Western Australia, Australia, laura.merla@ics.ul.pt
A preoccupation with geographic proximity is evident in family studies research generally and, at the level of theories of the family, can be attributed to the tendency (often implicit rather than explicit) to reify the notion of family as a private geographic domain represented by a household (Gubrium and Holstein 1990: 49). This reification mirrors the way nations and communities have been theorised as inherently connected to a geographical place. In response to this literature, the study of transnational families questions whether proximity is a necessary condition of the maintenance of kinship relations, and asks how distance impacts upon the ability of people to exchange care. International migration is not seen as a one-off event but rather a life-long process of complex interactions between individuals who often live great distances apart (Baldassar 2001; Gupta & Gerguson 1992). The emerging work on transnational families leads us to conceptualise family relations as transnational sets of processes, and to conceive of the home and host societies as part of the same social field in which geographic distance and national borders do not necessarily prevent transnational kinship relations, but shape them in particular ways.
In this session we wish to explore the diversity of the experiences of transnational families, with a specific focus on types of caregiving and the factors that shape those experiences. These include, but are not limited to, social class, gender, stages in the life-cycle, ethnicity, the social uses of new technologies, mobility, time and place.
Comparative papers will be privileged and we welcome papers that cover a diverse range of transnational family caregiving experiences including migrant care workers, refugees and professional migrants.

RC06 [host committee]/RC32
Gender equality and family transitions

Joint session of RC06 Family Research and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Eva Bernhardt, Stockholm University, Sweden, eva.bernhardt@sociology.su.se and Kari Skrede, Statistics Norway, Norway, kari.skrede@ssb.no
Discussant: Frances Goldscheider, University of Maryland, USA                  
We encourage papers that address the interrelationship between gender equality and family transitions, and which contribute to our understanding of how the processes by which family formation and expansion, family stability, and gender role changes that engage fathers with their children unfold in the lives of those currently in their family-building ages.
The Scandinavian countries have been in the forefront of the gender role revolution, with high proportions of fathers sharing the caring role with mothers, and even higher proportions of mothers sharing the providing role with fathers. They also do better than most other countries in maintaining fertility levels near replacement. Most research linking these trends has focused on the role of the state in reducing the conflict between women’s employment and family responsibilities, suggesting that this relatively high fertility is the result of state policies that provide women with job security, quality childcare and paid family leave. However, state support for women’s ability to combine employment with childrearing has also been cited as a source of the these countries’ relatively high rates of separation and divorce. But this research has seldom considered the origins of gender equality in the household during childhood and the young adult years, and rarely has it examined its consequences for family building and family dissolution later in young adulthood.
Scandinavian scholars as well as those from other countries where these processes are underway and are invited to be contributors.

RC06/RC32 [host committee]
Globalization, gender and families

Joint Session of RC06 Family Research and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Evangelia Tastsoglou, Saint Mary's University, Canada, evie.tastsoglou@smu.ca and Antoinette Hetzler, Lund University, Sweden, antoinette.hetzler@soc.lu.se
This session will focus on changing gender and family relations and structures in an increasingly globalized world. Such changes are contextualized first in the rise of neo-liberalism forcing women around the world to exit formal labour markets and relinquish well-established social and economic rights. Migration and “transnationalism from below”, or the constant movement of people across national borders in response to necessity, opportunity and gender roles, are also underlying the changing arrangements. Finally, racialization and the new security climate (“securitization”) globally are also affecting these changing arrangements. Diverse theoretical perspectives and conceptual frameworks in understanding the changes are particularly welcome. Such changing relations and structures include but are not limited to:  

RC07/RC09 [host committee]/TG02
Futures after the crisis: Theoretical, historical, and comparative perspectives

Thursday, July 15, 17:45-19:45
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research , RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development (host committee), and TG02 Thematic Group on Historical and Comparative Sociology
Chair: Markus Schulz, RC07, New York University, USA, markus.schulz@nyu.edu

RC07/RC10/RC36 [host committee]/RC48/RC51
Capitalism and crisis: Wither its future

Friday, July 16, 20:00-22:00
Joint session of RC07 Futures Research, RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management, RC36 Alienation Theory and Research, RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change, and RC51 Sociocybernetics
Organizer: Lauren Langman, Loyola University, USA, llang944@aol.com

RC07/RC13 [host committee]/RC23
Emerging technologies and leisure

Friday, July 16, 17:45-19:45
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research, RC13 Sociology of Leisure, and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: RC23 Scott North, Ozaka University, Japan, north@hus.osaka-u.ac.jp, RC13 Ishwar Modi, India International Institute of Social Sciences "The Universe", iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in
Computer-related activities have become important leisure forms in recent times. In some countries, these have grown into an addiction to the detriment of other activities. Other technological developments that are available to almost every one are gadgets such as mobile phones. An excessive preoccupation with networking virtually may have become detrimental to actual human contact that would be considered a major element of the leisure experience. How does technology contribute to the leisure experience?

RC07 [host committee]/RC14/RC23
New media futures. Part A. Theoretical Perspectives

Wednesday, July 14, 15:30-17:30
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research , RC14 Communication, Knowledge, and Culture and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: Christiana Constantopoulou, Panteion University, Greece, chconsta@panteion.gr and Markus S. Schulz, USA, isarc07@gmail.com
The Research Committees on Futures Research, RC07, Communication, Knowledge, and Culture, RC14, and Sociology of Science and Technology, RC23, are planning to convene one or more Joint Sessions on the general theme "Future of New Media". Papers may explore from theoretical, empirical, or normative perspectives critical issues such as

Papers may address current trends, alternative future scenarios, policy implications, social consequences, or processes for imagining and shaping media futures. 

RC07 [host committee]/RC14/RC23
New media futures. Part B. Collective action and politics

Friday, July 16, 17:45-19:45
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research , RC14 Communication, Knowledge, and Culture and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: Christiana Constantopoulou, Panteion University, Greece, chconsta@panteion.gr and Markus S. Schulz, USA, isarc07@gmail.com

RC07/R14 [host committee]
New media futures. Part C. Inequalities and practices

Thursday, July 15, 20:00-22:00
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research and RC14 Communication, Knowledge, and Culture
Organizers: Christiana Constantopoulou, Panteion University, Greece, chconsta@panteion.gr and Markus S. Schulz, USA, isarc07@gmail.com

RC07 [host committee]/RC16
Conceptualizing future in social theory

Tuesday, July 13, 15:30-17:30
Joint session of RC07 Futures Research and RC16 Sociological Theory
Organizers: Elisa P. Reis, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, epreis@alternex.com.br and Markus S. Schulz, USA, isarc07@gmail.com
How does sociology move towards the future after the death of determinism?  How do different strands of social theory deal with the future?  How do they conceptualize its relation to notions of structure, agency, power, experience, and imagination?  How could theories that avoid the future be modified?  What are the consequences for theories when a future orientation is brought in?  This session is meant to provide an opportunity for dialogue among scholars working in different modes of theorizing, including empirical, normative, micro, macro etc.

RC07 [host committee]/RC23
Technological futures

Thursday, July 15, 15:30-17:30
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizer: Gerardo del Cerro, Cooper Union, MIT, USA, gdelcerro@gmail.com
Among the possible questions that may be addressed are: What are the future visions regarding nanotechnologies, biomedicine, and genetics? Considering the advances in robotics, informatics, and artificial intelligence, how will we be impacted when more and more decisions are being made by nonhuman entities? How does the current economic crisis affect technological innovations and the relationships between energy, capital, and information? What methodologies are best suited to approach the new technological futures? What role can public sociology play in the shaping of visions about new technologies, their regulation and utilization?

RC07/RC23 [host committee]
The Role of the internet in the future development of science in third world countries

Friday, July 16, 10:45-12:45
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: RC23 Jaime Jiménez, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México, jjimen@servidor.unam.mx, and RC07 Markus Schulz, UIUC, USA, isarc07@gmail.com
The implications of a robust frame for new information and communication technologies (ICT) in industrialized countries on widening the gap between and among countries have been discussed. However, little has been said about the fact that many academics in the Third World are being provided with frontier ICT equipment to keep them competitive in the global domain of science and technology. This session encourages reflections and studies on the positive and negative consequences of the interactions between these countries’ scholars and their counterparts from the industrialized world.  Colleagues are invited to present papers on the creation of new invisible colleges of scholars as facilitated by ICT and the potential of these new forms of collegiality in the future.

RC07/RC23 [host committee]/RC32
Gender, science, technology and innovation, and the future

Friday, July 16, 15:30-17:30
Joint Session of RC07 Futures Research, RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Radhamany Sooryamoorthy, University KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, sooryamoorthyr@ukzn.ac.za and Solange Simões, Eastern Michigan University, USA, ssimoes@emich.edu
The presence and absence of information and technology (ICT), as that exists today in different parts of the world, have opened up opportunities for scholars, including sociologists, to examine the ways technology is affecting society. As a fast developing realm of technology ICT is inventing new means of communication (mobile and wireless, for instance) that make the study of science communication both challenging and interesting. Although there is an overwhelming literature on science communication still there are areas to be explored, researched, and understood. The divide-including region and gender-is apparent in science as well. The ways the disparities in this divide of access to and availability of ICT is affecting communication in science are not easy to comprehend either. Many new areas of inquiry have sprung up, contributing to the knowledge of science communication across the world. This joint session is to bring together such theoretical, empirical, and methodological knowledge about science communication including its varieties of patterns, types and forms.

RC07 [host committee]/RC48
Social movements and the future. Part A. Organization and imagination

Tuesday, July 13, 17:45-19:45
Joint Session of RC07 Future Research and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change
Organizers: Markus S. Schulz, USA, isarc07@gmail.com and Benjamin Tejerina, Universidad del País Vasco, Spain, cjptemob@lg.ehu.es
The Research Committees on Future Research, RC07, and on Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change, RC48, are planning one or more Joint Sessions on contentious politics and on how social movements shape futures. Questions may include, but are not limited to: 

RC07/RC48 [host committee]
Social movements and the future. Part B. Mobilization and institutions

Thursday, July 15, 20:00-22:00
Joint Session of RC07 Future Research and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change
Organizer: Raquel Sosa, UNAM, Mexico, rsosa@servidor.unam.mx

RC07 [host committee]/RC48
Social movements and the future. Part C. Protest and outcomes

Friday, July 16, 10:45-12:45
Joint Session of RC07 Future Research and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change
Organizer: tba

RC09/RC13 [host committee]
Social transformations and changing leisure patterns

Thursday, July 15, 15:30-17:30
Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development and RC13 Sociology of Leisure
Co-Chairs: Fredrick Wherry, University of Michigan, USA,  ffwherry@umich.edu and Ishwar Modi, University of Rajasthan, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in
The fast changing socio-economic and political milieus in  many continents of the world - e.g. Latin America, Eastern Europe, South Africa, Asia - due to factors like globalization, privatization, colonial heritage, religion, modernization, large scale migrations etc., traditional leisure practices have undergone significant changes and modifications, giving rise to several new/hybrid forms of leisure. The interconnection and mutual impacts of these social transformations and leisure practices require more serious analyses in order to bring out the co-relationship between them. In pursuance of these issues debate and delebrations on such a theme as “Social Transformation and Changing Leisure Patterns” can hardly be overemphasized. 

RC09/RC23 [host committee]
Climate change, governance, technology, and the sustainability of cities

Wednesday, July 14, 20:00-22:00
Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Chairs: Emma Porio, Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines, eporio@ateneo.edu and Czarina Saloma Akpedonu, Ateneo Manila University, Philippines, csaloma@ateneo.edu
The impacts of climate change pose new risks and vulnerabilities for cities and create a new dimension to the challenges of urban sustainability. While sociologists have traditionally analyzed sustainability threats such as urban poverty, inequality and social exclusion, the impacts of climate change to cities (e.g., sea level rise for coastal cities, floods, increased storms), require new frames and concepts in the analyses and understanding of urban sustainability.

This panel will focus on the social and ecological risks and vulnerabilities of cities and their socio-economic, political and techno-scientific adaptations (e.g., governance models, scientific and technological systems) that contribute to urban sustainability. The panel is interested papers that highlight the importance of integrating concepts and methodologies from other fields in addressing the intersection of social and ecological vulnerabilities, adaptation, resilience, and sustainability of cities.

RC09 [host committee]/TG02
Global Economic crisis, varieties of capitalism and social inequality – Theoretical, historical and comparative perspectives

Wednesday, July 14, 15:30-17:30
Joint session of RC09 Social Transformations and Sociology of Development and TG02 Historical and Comparative Research
Co-Chairs: Ulrike Schuerkens, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, France,  uschuerkens@gmail.com and Willfried Spohn, University of Goettingen, Germany,  Willfried.Spohn@sowi.uni-goettingen.de
The current global financial and economic crisis has crucial consequences for world capitalism, economic globalization, economic core-periphery relations and the varieties of capitalism in the advanced Global North as well as the peripheral Global South. This joint session intends to analyze and discuss the sociological consequences of the current world crisis on social inequality, industrial relations, labour systems and unemployment in theoretical, historical and comparative perspectives. On the theoretical plane, it is of special interest to discuss the relations between economic globalization, northern and southern varieties of capitalism and national/trans-national forms of social inequality. On the historical-sociological plane, the major focus concentrates on a comparison between the sociological consequences of the Great Depression 1929-32 and the current global economic crisis. And on the comparative level, the contributions focus on the sociological consequences of the current global economic crisis for the varieties of advanced and peripheral societies and regions as well as changing centre-periphery relations. Macro- and micro-sociological contributions are welcome.

RC10 [host committee]/RC11
Aging well and its’ societal determinants in international perspective

Joint session of RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management [host committee] and RC11 Sociology of Aging  
Organizers: Julia Rozanova, RC10, Brown University, USA, Julia_Rozanova@brown.edu  and Andreas Hoff, Oxford Institute of Aging, UK, andreas.hoff@ageing.ox.ac.uk
Increasing alarm that the graying of the population may raise societal costs of eldercare has drawn attention on factors that keep older persons independent, productive, and healthy in later life, and led to emergence of the aging-well perspective. As numerous studies found positive associations between social participation and various aspects of older adults' physical and mental health, there is an assumption that keeping busy and socially engaged is an easy and inexpensive way to age well, and whether one achieves wellness in later life is up to the individual. This session aims to deconstruct this assumption by considering diverse individual and societal determinants of a person's ability or inability to age in a healthy state. It invites papers that explore factors that may expand or constrain opportunities for aging well for men and women who may differ by race, ethnicity, class, health and disability status, and other characteristics, and who live in different social, cultural, and economic contexts. It also welcomes papers that adopt interdisciplinary approaches or make cross-cultural comparisons.

RC10/RC36 [host committee]/RC48  
Society on the move(ments)  

Joint session of RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management, RC36 Alienation Theory and Research and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change
Organizer: Lauren Langman, Loyola University, USA, llang944@aol.com
Whatever else can be said of the current world, it is one of rapid social transformation. Globalization has transformed time and space such that there are increased ways in which the social movements that are the harbingers of change facilitate those changes. From the economic reversals of 2008 to the waning of US hegemony, there have been a variety of social mobilizations that would change the direction of the society.  Some are progressive such as the World Social Forum (not itself a movement but a site for movements) in which its adherents claim a better world is possible.   Some are reactionary such as various Messianic cults and movements that agree, a better world is possible-in the next life.  This session will attempt to examine some of the social movements of our age that may well lead to a  more democratic, progressive world—or perhaps a more dangerous, deadly world.

RC10 [host committee]/RC36/RC51
Democracy and sustainability. Balancing individualism and collectivism: Interactive design for democracy and sustainable futures

Joint session of RC10 Participation, Organizational Democracy and Self-Management, RC36 Alienation Theory and Research, and RC51 Sociocybernetics
Organizers: Janet McIntyre-Mills, Flinders University, Australia, janet.mcintyre@flinders.edu.au,  Lauren Langman, Loyola University, USA, llang944@aol.com, and Bernard Scott, Cranfield University, United Kingdom, b.c.e.scott@cranfield.ac.uk
Internationally we face the social, economic and environmental challenge to reduce the size of our carbon footprint. Liberal democracies are increasingly criticized for not: a)Representing the interests of diverse citizens (Scott 1998, Pape 2005, Devji 2005),b) Engaging stakeholders in dialogue (Dryzek 1999, 2000, Borradori, 2004).c) Building a shared sense of identity, whilst enabling individual diversity, capability and freedom to the extent that the diversity, capability and freedom of others is not undermined (Sen 2000; Nussbaum 2006; McIntyre-Mills et al 2006, 2007).d) Addressing complex concerns that span national boundaries which impacts on accountability and socio-environmental risks (Beck 1992,1998, Borradori 2003,Grugel 1999, Pape 2005,Pierre 2000, Singer 2002, Flannery, 2005).Globalists argue for governance and participatory democracy to span boundaries so as to address human rights and conserve the environment for the future; whereas neo-liberals caution that global checks and balances are needed (see Kjaer 2004, Pierre and Peters 2000). Florini  (2003: 83) sums up the challenge for democracy of ensuring accountability and representation across government and non-government organizations and enabling greater linkages at the local, national and international level as follows:
 “…when decision making reaches the rarefied level of intergovernmental organizations or even informal multilateral rule making, the threads of democratic accountability can be stretched very thin … Accountability to the general public is at best indirect, and often… it does not exist at all  ...[The] mechanisms we have put in place to deal with large scale collective action problems seem so thoroughly inadequate when matched up against the scale of the problems…”.
This session will explore the extent to which we can enable participation to enhance democracy and governance through enhancing participation using e-democracy and e-governance.

RC11/13 [host committee] 
Ageing populations and leisure

Joint session of RC11Sociology of Aging and RC13 Sociology of Leisure
Organizers: Ishwar Modi, RC13,  India Institute of Social Sciences, Jaipur, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in and  Sara Arber, RC11,  University of Surrey, Guildford, UK, S.Arber@surrey.ac.uk

RC11 [host committee]/RC55
Worlds of difference in qualities of life for older people living in developing and developed countries

Joint session of RC11 Sociology of Aging and RC55 Social Indicators
Organizers: Jaco Hoffman, Oxford University,UK, jacobus.hoffman@ageing.ox.ac.uk and Valerie Moller, Rhodes University, South Africa, v.moller@ru.ac.za
What it means to grow old in dignity differs according to culture, social organisation, and the level of living of a society. Gerontologists and social indicators researchers need to be aware of these differences and the challenges they pose to empowering older people living in vastly different circumstances to make the most of their social and economic environment. Efforts to assess the difficulties and opportunities by means of qualitative and quantitative assess-ment may be a first step to moving towards better solutions for a later life of quality in both developed and developing societies. Particularly welcomed for this session are papers reporting on assessments of quality of life of older people in their part of the world. 

RC11/RC55 [host committee]
Older people's contributions to societal well-being

Joint session of RC11 Sociology of Aging and RC55 Social Indicators
Organizers: Sara Arber, University of Surrey, United Kingdom, S.Arber@surrey.ac.uk, and Wolfgang Glatzer, Goethe University, Germany,  Glatzer@soz.uni-frankfurt.de
Older people make extensive contributions to societal well-being, for example through paid work, subsistence agriculture, voluntary work, neighbourly and community support, unpaid care for grandchildren, and unpaid care for sick/disabled family members. The session will examine the nature and extent of these contributions by older people and how they vary between developed and developing societies. Both conceptual and measurement issues will be addressed.  

RC12/RC53 [host committee]
Defining childhood by law
Joint Session of RC53 Sociology of Childhood and RC12 Sociology of Law
Organizers: Sabina Schutter, Berlin, Germany, schutter@vamv.de, Robert van Krieken, University of Sydney, Australia,robertvk@usyd.edu.au and Peter, Robson University of Strathclyde, UK, peter.robson@strath.ac.uk
Children usually have limited access to legal actorship although they are addressed by law in many ways. The ways they are addressed are influenced by the definition of childhood and the child as a legal object and vice versa. Legal fields usually concerning childhood are family law, youth welfare, and child protection. The round table deals with national differences and the definition of children concerning their actorship and/or its consequences.
The session welcomes papers dealing with questions like:

RC13/RC14 [host committee]/RC30
Changes in work and leisure - Media and the public space

Tuesday, July 13, 15:30-17:30
Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure, RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC30 Sociology of Work
Organizer:Ishwar Modi, University of Rajasthan, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in
Work ethos has laid emphasis on unions and demands for better work conditions from employers. Most of the time the changing dimensions of leisure – how it can be used to enhance working conditions and make them more favourable –has not been given due consideration. Public spaces are increasingly being used for self expression or for participation in various forms of cultural products. These often form part of the work time-space. An exploration of these could enable leisure spaces to becomes part of the working spaces.  

RC13 [host committee]/RC15
Leisure: A pathway to health and happiness

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure (host committee) and RC15 Sociology of Health
Organizers: Ishwar Modi RC13, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005@yahoo.co.in and Ellen Annandale, University of Leicester, UK eca7@le.ac.uk
Papers are welcome which address the following themes. Leisure has formed an important element in the maintenance of physical and mental health and resulting happiness. Inversely it can be said that activities undertaken for the enhancement of physical and mental health generally fall under the overall rubric of ‘leisure’, since they do not directly contribute to material production. All cultures have had inbuilt spaces for such activities – be they in the form of games, sports, festival or carnivals. Traditional leisure forms may need to be revived and given new attention and new impetus. In order to maintain the happiness and health levels of society it may be worth examining governmental and non-governmental initiatives being taken in this field.

RC13 [host committee]/RC21
Urbanizing societies and leisure

Friday, July 16, 20:00-22:00
Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure and RC21 Regional and Urban Development
Organizer: Ishwar Modi, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in, Ranvinder Singh Sandhu, University Amritsar, India, ranvindershandhu@gmail.com and Kulwinder Kaur, Jamia Millia Islamia University, India, kulwinder10@gmail.com
Urban centers are growing in an unwieldy fashion all over the world leading to innumerable infrastructural and civic problems. Problems of both private and public spaces are becoming acute leading to various kinds of deprivations as also alienation. The anonymity of city life causes loneliness and isolation leading to unforeseen mental stresses ‑ these include factors like long commuting hours, impersonal social relationships, loss of identity, etc. Under the circumstances, leisure spaces and opportunities are also shrinking in spite of the realization that leisure can redeem the trauma faced by growing urban population. Such a situation also poses the questions of social justice in the broader perspective of sustainability. How leisure should be utilized and public spaces used to enhance the quality of urban life for all section of the people is a moot question.

RC13 [host committee]/RC24
Leisure and tourism: Environmental dimensions

Joint Session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure and RC24 Environment and Society
Organizers: Ishwar Modi, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in and Ralph Matthews, University of British Columbia, Canada, Ralph.matthews@ubc.ca
The tourism industry has gained a momentum that is perhaps out of all proportion among other leisure related activities. Commercial concerns often override the overall individual and social benefits that might accrue from this activity. One of the casualties in the race for ‘reaching’ more places and attracting larger ‘numbers’ of persons is the natural and cultural environment. Culture is often ‘performed’ rather than lived for the benefit of the tourist. The impact on the natural environment may be ignored as tour mangers look for more facilities in areas that hitherto have maintained a pristine and clean environment.

RC13 [host committee]/RC32
Leisure time: Women, work and family

Joint Session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Ishwar Modi, India International Institute of Social Sciences, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in and Elizabeth Mathew, Kerala University, India, ebmathew.eb@gmail.com
Women’s status and social image is changing fast the world over. Globally, though not everywhere, the most significant trend is probably women’s increased participation in the labour market. However, throughout the world, women continue to be in charge of the greatest part of house work and child care. As such the distribution of time remains unequal between the genders practically everywhere, as shown by the Time Budget studies carried out, with men generally having more discretionary time for leisure than women. Constraints of the double day for employed women and non-employed women’s primary responsibility for house-hold labour result in domestic labour having a stronger effect on women’s leisure than on that of men. Several studies have shown that women have significantly less time for both total and domestic leisure than men. However, at the world level, we can discern a strengthening of the values attached to leisure and a clear development of leisure practices. As such, how has women’s leisure evolved in the midst of and outside the family needs to be examined and deliberated?  

RC13/RC34/RC53 [host committee]
Growing up in 21century: Leisure, lifestyles and unequal chances of children and the youth
Joint Session of RC53 Sociology of Childhood, RC34 Sociology of Youth and RC13 Sociology of Leisure.
Organizers: Alexandra König, University of Wuppertal, akoenig@uni-wuppertal.de
NP Ngai , The Chinese University of Hong Kong, npngai@swk.cuhk.edu.hk
Ishwar Modi, University of Rajasthan, India, iiiss2005modi@yahoo.co.in
The impact of childhood and youth on life chances and lifelong development is a growing area of concern. Familial as well as public and professional investment into educational careers, purposeful use of young people’s leisure time, habitus formation, acquisition of health behaviour etc. is growing and this is reflected in a renewal of social policy which relies heavily onto investment into young people. This opens a new area of research between childhood and youth sociology, analysing such endeavours and their impact onto further life. The session welcomes papers dealing with childhood and youth in a biographical perspectives, analyzing social inequalities in childhood and youth and there significance for development, reconstructing public and private approaches of socialization of young people and their qualities and failures and identifying the significance of this phase of life.

RC13/RC54 [host committee]
Body and nature in leisure: A gender perspective body and nature in leisure

Joint session of RC13 Sociology of Leisure and RC54 The Body in the Social Sciences
Organizers: Veena Sharma, RC13, Prajna Foundation, India, vsharma136@gmail.com and Bianca Maria Pirani, RC54, “Sapienza”, University of Rome, Italy, biancamaria. pirani@uniroma1.it
An understanding of the body is an essential aspect of experiencing leisure – for it is through the body-mind complex that leisure can be experienced. The body is also used as a means of providing leisure – art forms representing the body have throughout human history been a major form of expressing leisure and connecting with the environment and nature.. A different dimension to leisure can be provided by looking into the gender perspective and considering the role that the different genders play in social life and their specific requirements. As a body that performs the function of creation – of giving birth – there is a need to look into leisure of women in that role. The needs of the body and its care in and during that role need to be looked at from a leisure perspective also. Its role in maintaining a body-mind harmony and good health for a healthier society that is on the move. This can be looked at through the perspective changing traditions and the influx of new technologies.
Besides, there is the dichotomy between the leisure of men and women when it comes to leisure in which the body plays a specific role – examples of these may be in the use of harmonising tools such as tai chi, aerobics or ballet. The martial arts which have largely been a domain of males have a different leisure dynamics.

RC14/RC23 [host committee]
Surveillance and popular culture

Joint Session of RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizers: RC23 Torin Monahan, Vanderbilt University, USA, torin.monahan@vanderbit.edu
This session will analyze overlaps between popular media representations of surveillance and actual surveillance practices.  Attention will be given to the role of media in translating public concerns over new surveillance systems and the influence of media upon the development and deployment of surveillance systems more generally.

RC14 [host committee]/RC37
Intellectuals on the move in the global age

Round Table
Joint session of RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC37 Sociology of Arts
Chair: Olivier Chantraine, Université Lille, France, olivier.chantraine@univ-lille3.fr

RC14/RC37 [host committee]
Culture on the move: Arts and societies in the 21st century - rationalization in the arts

Joint session of RC14 Sociology of Communication, Knowledge and Culture and RC37 Sociology of Arts
Organizer: J. Halley,  University of Texas at San Antonio, USA, Jeffrey.Halley@utsa.edu
All cultures have been troubled by the symbolic: there starts the general problem of hermeneutics within the human sciences and especially sociology. All sociology is a process of demystification, the unveiling of the “truth” behind the taken for granted of everyday life. The problem with the use of culture as an analytical concept, as it has developed within culture and media studies, is that it has become vacuous  because it is often used (just in the way art has been used) to smuggle in an evaluative judgment. Distinctions between realms of symbolic production, consumption and heir associated value regimes have been historically  and socially created such that the evaluative distinctions that are widely used in our society and which underpin, in a taken-for-granted way, much evaluative debate between art and science for instance. Within each specialized field the producers and consumers of art (or of science) are involved in  power relations (which constitute interpretative communities and associated value judgments): this session deals with  21st century art issues.

RC15 [host committee]/RC32
Women’s health and health risks in an unequal world

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC32 Women in Society
Organizers: Elianne Riska, RC15, University of Helsinki, Finland Elianne.riska@helsinki.fi and Alphia Possamai-Inesedy, RC32, University of Western Sydney, Australia alphia.possamai@uws.edu.au
This session will deal with the global conditions that influence the material conditions and the social definitions of women’s health. The session will also include an examination of new public health policies on risk, responsibilities and implications for women in different parts of the world. A global perspective on these themes will illuminate the structural patterns that shape the health conditions for different groups of women.   

RC15 [host committee]/RC52
Remaking the health professional workforce

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups
Organizers: Ellen Kuhlmann, RC15, University of Bath, UK, e.c.kuhlmann@bath.ac.uk and Mike Saks, RC52, University of Lincoln, UK msaks@lincoln.ac.uk
New health policies and workforce change produce complex changes in the structure of the health workforce as well as in professional identities and the avenues of professionalization. This in turn calls for further theoretical and empirical investigation. This session focuses on the complex drivers for change fuelled by different interests, policies and players. Strong dynamics arise, amongst other things, from initiatives centred on different patterns of skill-mix and collaborative care, as well as the professionalization of new groups such as complementary and alternative therapies. Other important arenas of change relate to gender arrangements, more flexible employment patterns and the challenge to existing professional boundaries posed by new mobility and migration flows. Papers are invited that explore the ‘making’ of a future health professional workforce based on political and organizational change and dynamics arising ‘bottom-up’ from the professional and professionalizing workforce.

RC17/RC46 [host committee]
Work, management in a globalizing world economy / Le travail, la gestion dans un monde en voie de globalisation de l’économie

Joint session of RC17 Sociology of Organization and RC46 Clinical Sociology
Chair : John Cultiaux, Belgium, johncultiaux@yahoo.fr
Work structures and organizational management strategies are deeply reconsidered in the context of sustained pressures linked to the globalization of the economy, increasing to a maximum in a major time crisis like the one we are in now, reaching out all the countries. What are the consequences for individuals, workers or managers, submitted to such productivity constraints, in search of excellence through a competitive world and forced to develop strategic survival strategies, in companies and services? What are the resistance or alternative strategies and changes developed by the different social actors involved in those situations?  How can a clinical sociology approach contribute as such to improve their quality of life at work?

Les  formes de travail et les stratégies de la  gestion des organisations sont profondément redéfinies dans le contexte des pressions persistantes liées à la globalisation de l’économie, accentuées au maximum dans des périodes de crises majeures comme celle que nous traversons sur le plan économique, dans l’ensemble des pays. Quels sont les effets sur les individus, travailleurs ou gestionnaires, soumis à des exigences de productivité, d’excellence liée à la compétition et contraints à développer des stratégies de survie des entreprises et des services? Quelles sont les stratégies de résistance ou d’alternative et les changements produits par les divers acteurs sociaux soumis à ces contraintes? Comment la sociologie clinique peut-elle contribuer à ainsi améliorer leur qualité de vie au travail?

RC17 [host committee]/RC52
Reconnecting professional organizations with professional occupations

Joint session of RC17 Sociology of Organization and RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups
Organizers: Daniel Muzio, University of Leeds, United Kingdom,
dm@lubs.leeds.ac.uk and Julia Evetts, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom, Julia.evetts@nottingham.ac.uk
Historically, the analysis of professions has been connected to broad sociological issues such as occupational closure, social stratification and exclusion, state formation and the development of a capitalist economic order. In the last fifteen years, however, a new research agenda has begun to emerge . This is characterized by a discovery of the organizational dimension of expert work, and the focus on the professional service firm (PSF) and its management as an increasingly topical subject area. But while this topic is now receiving much attention from a wide constituency of academics and practitioners, our knowledge of how organizations and professions interact and the evolving relationship between them remains limited. On the one hand, management theorists, especially those focused on the internal organization of PSFs, give little or no attention to the wider context and role of occupations as collective groups outside of organizations. In turn we find a relative neglect of organizations in many sociological accounts, at least until recently. Burrage and Torstendahl (1990) for example, identify four key ‘actors’ in the development of professions – practicing members, users, the state and universities – but say little when it comes to the distinctive role of employing organizations.

By contrast, the objective of the sessions here is to encourage a different research agenda, one that – in order to further advance our understanding of contemporary professionalism – makes a far more explicit connection between organizations and professions as collective agents. To this effect, we propose to explore two central themes that emerge from the interface between professional organizations and occupations. The first is how professionals are responding to these changes and opportunities posed by new organizational contexts through alternative strategies and tactics. Second is how organizations themselves have become increasingly important sites where professional identities are defined, mediated and regulated and have more generally emerged as significant agents in the institutionalization and regulation of new areas of professional expertise. We welcome any contribution targeting these broad themes or contributing, more generally, to our knowledge of the inter-relationship between professional occupations and organizations.

RC21/RC23 [host committee]
Local manifestations of global surveillance

Wednesday, July 14, 17:45-19:45
Joint Session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development and RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology
Organizer: Torin Monahan and David Lyon, Department of Sociology, Queen’s University, Canada, lyond@queensu.ca and Murli M. Sinha, Rochester Institute of Technology, USA, msinha@rochester.rr.com
This session will explore cultural and regional differences in what might be considered to be global surveillance practices.  Particular attention will be given to the development of public-private partnerships and the ongoing privatization of surveillance and security.    

RC21 [host committee]/RC43
Cities and the housing boom/bust

Tuesday, July 13, 15:30-17:30
Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development and RC43 Housing and Built Environment
Organizers: Manuel Aalbers, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, m.b.aalbers@gmail.com and Ken Gibb, University of Glasgow, UK, k.gibb@socsci.gla.ac.uk
Housing markets are highly dependent on the economic performance of cities. Yet, local housing market boom/bust is shaped not only at the city level, but also at the national and increasingly as the financial crisis of 2007-2009 makes clear at the global level. Local, national and global factors interact to produce housing booms/busts. A housing boom may be seen as a sign of economic vitality of a city, but also implies an affordability crisis for large parts of the urban population. A housing bust may be connected to an economic downturn and may result in redundant housing in one city and only a pause in increasing house prices in another.
Possible topics for this session include, but are not limited to:

RC22 [host committee]/RC34
Youth and religion. I

Joint session of RC22 Sociology of Religion and RC34 Sociology of Youth
Organizer: Sebastian Nastuta, "Petre Andrei" University of Iasi, Romania, sebastian.nastuta@gmail.com
The research tradition of religious phenomena assimilates young age, and mainly adolescence, with the major religious transformations in a person’s life cycle.
Over time, researchers interested in the study of religious conversion, in secularization or in the adhesion to the New Religious Movements have paid special attention to young people. What is happening now? Do young people still constitute an interesting category for the sociology of religion? 
Research topics like religious socialization, religious formal education, youth religious practices, behaviours and spirituality, radical and alternative religious movements, the influence of religion on youth values, norms, social aspirations and social capital, the methodological and ethical aspects of researching youth or, looking from the opposite direction, the influence of youth (sub) culture on religion could be interesting subjects for this section.  

RC22 [host committee]/TG04
Risk society and religion

Joint session of RC22 Sociology of Religion and TG04 Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty
Organizers: Jens O. Zinn, University of Melbourne, Australia, jzinn@unimelb.edu.au and Alphia Possamai-Inesedy, University of Western Sydney, Alphia.Possamai@uws.edu.au
The Risk Society thesis warns us not only about the rise and change of type of risks that the whole world is facing but the challenges caused by institutional individualization that urges people to deal with risk and uncertainty individually. Whilst Giddens emphasises that late modernity would see the rise of a new prudent subject, Beck is more open regarding the possible negative responses to recent social changes which might even lead to increasing xenophobia or religious fundamentalism.
There is little empirically informed theoretical work on individuals’ responses to the challenges of late modernity which shows the advantage of religion as a resource for dealing with uncertainty (Zinn 2006). However, religion is involved in reflexive modernization in two ways: Firstly, religion is a valuable resource to deal with risk and uncertainty, however how people use religions to deal with risk and uncertainty differ and are not yet sufficiently understood. In an international perspective it is important to see how religions integrate uncertainties differently. Secondly, religions are part of general social transformations. This is reflected in the change within religions and the rise of new religions or new forms of belief. Religions engage in issues of sustainable and reflexive development (e.g. Ecotheology and neo-pagan groups), and some groups (e.g. fundamentalist groups) offer some island of security to people’s rise of worries.
This session seeks to explore religions involvement in reflexive modernization to fill the gap in the existing literature that poorly addresses issues of religion and the risk society.

RC23 [host committee]/RC47/RC48
Towards a dialogue between scientists, civic groups and social movements. Part I
Joint session of RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology, RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements, and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change. Organizers: RC23 Paulo Martins, Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas, Brazil, marpaulo1@uol.com.br, RC47 Henri Lustiger Thaler, Ramapo College, USA, lustigerthaler@aol.com, and RC48 Benjamin Tejerina, University of the Basque Country, Spain, b.tejerina@ehu.es
Science, technology and social and economic interests are profoundly intertwined today, interacting and mutually influencing one another. Many movements that are struggling for changes now recognize that, unless these issues are taken up by many and various groups of citizens, it will not be possible to deal with the challenges of our times. The call for this panel is anchored on the idea that the building of a space of open cooperation, for widespread public and democratic debate among scientists, NGOs and social movements at a world level, will open new and exciting opportunities.  These spaces will promote and develop the idea that knowledge should be considered one of the common goods of humanity; confront the challenges addressing the exercise of social responsibility by scientists; strengthen the autonomy of scientific research, defending its public mission and striving to improve the conditions in which scientific activities are conducted by students, researchers and engineers;  enhance the capacity of civic movements to produce knowledge and to be partners of scientific institutions; and  strengthen the capacity of our societies, in both North and South, to take democratic decisions in the field of science and technology. Scientists and social movements need to share their expertise and ideas in order to build a society that better respects human rights, cultural diversity, and social and economic needs.

RC23 [host committee]/RC47/RC48
Towards a dialogue between scientists, civic groups and social movements. Part II
Joint session of RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology, RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements, and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change. Organizers: RC23 Paulo Martins, Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas, Brazil, marpaulo1@uol.com.br, RC47 Henri Lustiger Thaler, Ramapo College, USA, lustigerthaler@aol.com, and RC48 Benjamin Tejerina, University of the Basque Country, Spain, b.tejerina@ehu.es

RC23/RC47 [host committee]/RC48
Towards a dialogue between scientists, civic groups and social movements. Part III
Joint session of RC23 Sociology of Science and Technology, RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements, and RC48 Social Movements, Collective Action and Social Change. Organizers: RC23 Paulo Martins, Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas, Brazil, marpaulo1@uol.com.br, RC47 Henri Lustiger Thaler, Ramapo College, USA, lustigerthaler@aol.com, and RC48 Benjamin Tejerina, University of the Basque Country, Spain, b.tejerina@ehu.es

RC24/RC55 [host committee]
Sustainability and quality of life: concordant or conflicting goals of societal development?

Joint Session of RC24 Environment and Society and RC55 Social Indicators
Organizers: Heinz-Herbert Noll, Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, Germany, heinz-herbert.noll@gesis.org and Mercedes Pardo, University Carlos III of Madrid, Spain, mercedes.pardo@uc3m.es
In recent years the discourses about sustainability and quality of life have been more and more converging, although it still remains unsettled how the two concepts and goals actually are related to each other. This joint session invites first of all papers addressing explicitly such a relationship. The session also welcomes papers presenting empirical evidence on the link between sustainability and quality of life and/or discussing related measurement issues.

RC25/RC32 [host committee]
Gender and sexuality and discourses on citizenship

Joint session of RC25 Language and Society and RC32 Women in Society
Co-organizers: Margaret Abraham, Hofstra University, USA, mabraham2010wc@hofstra.edu and Celine-Marie Pascale, American University, USA, pascale@american.edu
This panel will explore gender, sexuality and discourses on citizenship through two primary frames: 1. How discourses of citizenship construct, reproduce and contest particular conceptions of gender and sexuality. 2. How discourses of gender and sexuality construct, reproduce and contest particular notions of citizenship.  We are particularly interested in papers that explore identity formation and citizenship through analyses of language and representation and which address possibilities for social change.  Analyses may include any variety of cultural, historical and political spheres.

Themes for paper submissions may include but are not limited to:

RC25 [host committee]/RC36
The Language of terror

Joint Session of RC25 Language and Society and RC36 Alienation Theory and Research
Co-Organizers: Sandi Michele De Oliveira, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, smo@hum.ku.dk and Devorah Kalekin, University of Haifa, Israel, dkalekin@univ.haifa.ac.il
This session is concerned with some of the most prominent political and cultural problems facing the contemporary world. In particular, it examines the relationship of mass media and global terrorism. How is terrorism linked to the war on terrorism?  Is terrorism, as fundamentally communicative act, dependent upon global media networks? We are interested in the relationship between the 'mediasphere,' terrorism, and ongoing competitions over meaning.  Topics might include but are not limited to: the 'axis of evil'; the media's role in constructing 'weapons of mass destruction' as central in relation to Iraq; the significance of the mass media in circulating images of the hostages taken by 'insurgents' in Iraq; and the media distribution of images of the prisoner abuses at Abu Ghraib. This session invites scholars working within political science, sociology, media and cultural studies, critical theory, and communication studies on issues concerning the construction of war on terror and on the related language and culture wars.

RC26/RC46 [host committee]
Clinical sociology and sociological practice: Contributions to policy and practice / La sociologie clinique et la sociologie pratiquée: Contributions aux politiques et pratiques

Joint sessions of RC26, Sociotechnics, Sociological practice and RC46 Clinical Sociology
Chair : Jan Marie Fritz, University of Cincinnati, USA, jan.fritz@uc.edu
Action research in sociology refers to many methodological traditions, for example, the participatory action research approach, an interactionist systemic approach (sociotechnics), or a variety of consciousness raising methods (life stories, group work, collective action). Those methods are applied in different settings: organizational, institutional, educative, urban policies, political. What can we discover in the actual developments in ‘sociological practice’ and ‘clinical sociology’? What are the convergent epistemological, sociological, methodological dimensions for those cousin sectors of sociology? What are the main divergent ones? One common issue, resulting from the roject of developing  theory in social practice is the ethical one: how does the sociologist, involved in a participatory or clinical approach, deal with ethics and politics?

Différentes traditions méthodologiques sous-tendent la recherche action  en sociologie, de la recherche-action participative, à l’approche systémique interactive, à diverses méthodes de conscientisation (histoire de vie, travail de groupe, action collective). L’application de ces diverses méthodologie se fait dans divers domaines : organisationnel, institutionnel, éducatif, de politiques urbaines, politique. Que pouvons-nous apprendre des développements actuels de la ‘sociologie pratique’ ou de ceux de la ‘sociologie dite clinique’?  Quels sont les points de convergences, épistémologiques, sociologiques, méthodologiques et les points de divergences entre ces deux secteurs voisins de la pratique sociologique?  Un enjeu commun, découlant de l’intention de produire de la théorie au cœur de la pratique sociale est l’enjeu éthique. Comment le sociologue impliqué dans une recherche participative ou clinique traite-t-il la question éthique et du lien avec la politique?

RC26/WG01 [host committee]
Cellular globalization in between local and global social dimensions

Joint session of RC26 Sociotechnics, Sociological Practice and WG01 Sociology of Local-Global Relations
CoChairs: Krzysztof Ostrowski, Pultusk School of Humanities, Poland, ostrow@wsh.edu.pl and Nikita Pokrovsky, Higher School of Economics, Russia, nikita@gol.ru
The session will examine activity of cellular networks and NGO on different levels and its role in state and sub-regional decision-making.

RC32/RC41 [host committee]
Gender, education and reproductive choices: A cross-cultural perspective

Joint session of RC32 Women in Society and RC41 Sociology of Population
Organizers: Indira Ramarao, University of Mysore, Mysore, India, indiraramarao@rediffmail.com and Laura Corradi, Università della Calabria, Italy, laura.corradi@unical.it
There is an increasing realization that population is not just about numbers. Issues relating to population growth or decline have to be understood from different perspectives, of which the gender perspective is a prime one. The influence of gender is further affected by the interplay of socio-economic and cultural factors. This joint session of RC41 and RC32 proposes to examine the  levels at which  female education has an impact on fertility related decisions in a multi-cultural setting. The session invites presentations, which focus on theoretical perspectives on the relationship between women’s reproductive choices and their educational levels, and case studies from different parts of the world.

Papers are invited for presentation in this joint session on the following broad themes:

All these issues would be expected to focus on Female Education. Each abstract will be reviewed keeping in view its contribution to the methodology and conceptual issues of Sociology of Population and Gender Studies.

RC33/RC51 [host committee]
Reflective modeling

Joint session of RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology and RC51 Sociocybernetics
Organizer: Cor van Dijkum, Utrecht University, c.j.vandijkum@uu.nl
In the social sciences the researcher is a long time considered as neutral and objective observer. Also the models that were constructed to describe and understand the objects of research were considered as an unproblematic, undetached from the researcher, as observer or experimenter. However a number of phenomena in the practice of social research such as the Hawthorne effect, or that a prediction of a model functions as a self-fulfilling prophecy, raises doubt about this view. A number of phenomena such as the ‘Clever Hans effect’, ‘ Observer-expectancy effect’, ‘Placebo effect’, ‘Pygmalion effect’ increases this doubt. Even the late Karl Popper contemplated that in the social sciences as well in  the natural sciences a prediction influenced the event predicted (for all those arguments see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self-fulfilling_prophecy). Science is not only dealing with the facts of the past and the present, but also with facts of a possible future.

For action-researchers and socio-cyberneticians it is a starting point that a researcher  is in a feedback relation with the phenomena he tries to observe, describe, explain,  to influence and to create.  A researcher or instrument of research is involved in a continuous feedback loop in which phenomena not only are investigated but also created. That can be observed in the long run in the history of the sciences.  Many concepts, such as ‘self’, ‘psyche’, ‘awareness’, ’diseases’, ’anemia’, ’psychosis’, ‘alienation’ now used in daily life, originated from scientific discourses. In the natural sciences, particularly in quantum mechanics, it is realized that research is not isolated from the phenomena one is observing, but a part of it, and as a consequence changing the world.  For the action scientist this idea is reflected in the idea that a researcher as a subject observes objects that can be subjects that observe the researcher in turn as objects. What is observed in science is always a product of interaction between phenomena in the world, theories that are used to understand the world, and instruments like computers build to extend the capacity of human beings to deal with the world. A model functions in this point of view as a bridge between the theory and the phenomena in the world. It comprehends (deduced) concept from theory and (induced) concepts from observations and is an instrument in the feedback between researcher and the (facts of past and future the) world.  In this respect it is a reflected model because the researcher using his model to compare his theory with facts from the past and anticipated future, will change the model when the comparison is not according the expectation.

Reflected models introduce a number of (methodo)logical puzzles. How do we deal with the reflection of a model that becomes part of the model?  Do we need a meta-model and how is that feed back in the model? And how do we cope with an instability a prediction from scientific model introduces in the world?  For example a self-fulfilling prophecy deduced from an economic theory about the management of an economic crisis.  Or a prediction from election research short before the election that motivates the crowd to elect different.  How can we stabilize the act of observation that for the moment being a goal of legitimate action can be supported? Is the strategy of science to aim at stability as an adequate anticipation of the future?  How is that incorporated in (Methodo)logic of the reflected model? Offers the new science of complexity a solution with their non linear computer models in which instability is a phase to come to stability?
In this session researchers are invited from different disciplines, both from qualitative side as well from quantitative side, to demonstrate how they cope with reflected models in their practice of research.

RC33/TG04 [host committee]
Methodological and conceptual issues in risk

Joint sessions of RC33 Logic and Methodology in Sociology and TG04 Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty
Organizer: Jens O Zinn, University of Melbourne, Australia, jzinn@ormond.unimelb.edu.au
In recent decades ‘risk’ became ubiquitous in academia as well as public discourse. Since the early work of Douglas and Wildavsky on Risk and Culture and Beck and Giddens on the risk society sociological research on risk gained ground. However, systematic conceptual and methodological discussions of risk research are less developed.

This sessions aims to bring together experiences with different qualitative and quantitative research strategies their problems and advantages and how they contribute to a better understanding of risk. Papers are welcome from all kinds of methodological backgrounds such as standardised risk perception research, group discussions, narrative and biographical interviewing, content analysis, (historical) semantic or discourse analysis, discourse or policy network analysis.

RC36 [host committee]/RC37
Art, alienation and politics of resistance

Joint session of RC36 Alienation Theory and Research and and RC37 Sociology of Arts
Organizers:  Lauren Langman, Loyola University, USA, Llang944@aol.com and Jeff Halley,  University of Texas San Antonio, USA, Jeffrey.Halley@utsa.edu 
Political transformations have long relied on aesthetic representations, indeed  Durkheim pointed out how flags, as collective representations, symbols of the society, evoked passionate feelings.  Let us think of the hammer and sickle, the swastika, the stars and stripes or the Star of David (mogen david).  Similarly, the songs and music of politics have evocative power, the Marseillaise, the Internationale, or Star Spangled banner.  Just as dominant States or movements may use symbolic aesthetic representations to sustain willing assent, so too do counter hegemonic resistance groups venerate the peace sign, Kumbaya or We Shall Overcome. This session will be devoted to understanding the various ways, however mediated, in which art and aesthetics have been used as forms ofcounter-hegemonic resistance, in various expressions of challenge and contestation.

RC36/RC54 [host committee]
Waving the bloody body: The modern mobilization of a wounded imagery on behalf of multiple identities

Joint session of RC36 Alienation Theory and Research and RC54 The Body in the Social Sciences
Organizer: Marty Prosono, Misssouri State University, USA, Mprosono@MissouriState.edu
Political, religious and national identities are often formed and given support through the  use of a body imagery that involves blood and wounds.  Whether it be visual images of bloody bodies removed from scenes of carnage or on religious icons or in religious rituals, the use of bodies may be the most powerful visual expression  of a spectrum of emotions – everything from the bitterest alienation to the most sublime forms of social solidarity.  This session seeks to explore more deeply the relationship between the physical body and the formational of religious and national identities.

RC36/RC54 [host committee] 
The boundaries of the body

Joint session of RC36 Alienation Theory and Research and RC54 The Body in the Social Sciences
Organizers:  Natalie Haber, Loyola University of Chicago, USA, Natalcat@aol.com and Jodie Allen, Cambridge University, UK, jta26@cam.ac.uk 
The body has become a major concern in contemporary sociology. This session will discuss the different forms of bodily alienation; exploring the discourse of Cartesian dualism while delving into issues surrounding the diagnosis of obsessions of the body, and the trajectory between empowerment and objectification concerning the body as commodity.

RC36/RC54 [host committee] 
Gender, work and bodies
   
Joint session of RC36 Alienation Theory and Research and RC54 The Body in the Social Sciences
Organizers:  Karolin Kappler, Universidad de Barcelona, Spain, Karolinkappler@web.de and Miriam Adelman, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Brazil, miriamad2008@gmail.com
This session will focus on the relationship between gender and bodies in work and labor market contexts. This approach may be fruitful for developing debates in the following three areas: gender studies, sociology of the body, and sociology of work and professions.  Important issues will be explored in a new light: how experiences in the world of work continue to be inflected not only by conventional (and non-conventional) notions of gender but also by strongly gender-normative definitions of (male and female) bodies. This promotes the building of promising new bridges with the currently burgeoning "new" area of sociology of the body -which has tended to focus on bodies in relation to such spheres as identity and consumption, or health, medicine and sexuality– and with the field of sociology of work, calling for reflections on often-neglected aspects of the social and sexual division of labor.

RC38/RC49 [host committee]
Biography and mental health

Joint session of RC38 Biography and Society and RC49 Mental Health and Illness
Organizer: Silvia Krumm, Ulm University, Germany, silvia.krumm@bkh-guenzburg.de and Gabriele Rosenthal, Georg-August-University of Goettingen, Germany, G.Rosenthal@gmx.de
Biography is considered to be an important concept in the field of mental health. Firstly, certain biographic conditions and/or events may contribute to the development of a mental disorder. Secondly, a mental disorder affects the biographic course. In this understanding coping is equivalent to “living with a mental disorder”. By referring to the subjective experience of a mental disorder, the biographic approach may enhance our understanding of mental health needs. Thirdly, professionals’ own biographic background as well as their reflective skills re biographic approach may have an impact on quality of care.
Nevertheless, against the background of the current biological paradigm in mental health, the importance of biography seems to be assessed as nearly irrelevant for psychiatric research and services. In this session we would like to counteract this tendency and reflect the diverse interrelations between biography and mental health. We would be glad to welcome papers focussing on the following topics:

      1. Biographic events and its impact on mental health
      2. Impact of mental disorders on biography
      3. Mental illness and biographic coping
      4. Biographic (ethnographic, narrative) approaches in mental health care and research

RC38 [host committee]/TG02
Transnational migration and (family) life-courses – Theoretical, historical and comparative perspectives

Joint session of RC38 Biography and Society and TG02 Historical and Comparative Sociology
Organizers: Ursula Apitzsch, Wolfgang-Goethe-University Frankfurt, Germany, apitzsch@soz.uni-frankfurt.de and Willfried Spohn, University of Goettingen, Germany, willfried.spohn@sowi.uni-goettingen.de
This joint session intends to bring together micro-sociological biographical research on the life-stories of migrants and historical-comparative sociological perspectives on international and transnational migration. Such perspectives include to historicize and compare individual life-stories of migrants and their families in varying past and present contexts of international and transnational migration. Different national, social and cultural origins from sending societies; different trajectories of migration between sending and receiving societies; different forms of incorporation and integration in receiving societies; different transnational ways of combining origins, movements and destinies – all these varying configurations of international and transnational migration are shaping the life-courses of migrants and their families. On this theoretical background, the session particularly invites contributions that contextualize, interpret and compare life-courses of international and transnational migrants in different historical and contemporary phases and varying local, national, transnational and global conditions.

RC40/RC47 [host committee]
Grassroots movements for sustainable, local and convivial consumption. Part I

Joint session of RC40 Sociology of Agriculture and Food and RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements
Organizer: Geoffrey Pleyers, University of Louvain, Belgium, Geoffrey.pleyers@uclouvain.be and Paola Rebughini, University of Milan, Italy, Paola.rebughini@unimi.it

RC40 [host committee]/RC47
Grassroots movements for sustainable, local and convivial consumption. Part II

Joint session of RC40 Sociology of Agriculture and Food and RC47 Social Classes and Social Movements
Organizer: Geoffrey Pleyers, University of Louvain, Belgium, Geoffrey.pleyers@uclouvain.be and Paola Rebughini, University of Milan, Italy, Paola.rebughini@unimi.it

RC53/RC55 [host committee]
Assessing children’s quality of life
Joint Session of RC53 Sociology of Childhood and RC55 Social Indicators
Organizers: Doris Bühler-Niederberger, University of Wuppertal, buehler@uni-wuppertal.de, and Heinz-Herbert Noll, GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences, heinz-herbert.noll@gesis.org
Assessing children’s quality of life has become a scientific as well as a political aim in the last years and a considerable amount of studies and specific reports on “child well-being” have been published recently. Many of them put a focus on international comparison and even on rankings of countries and regions in league tables. Different methods of life quality assessment may be used and the results are therefore sometimes overlapping, sometimes diverging. The session particularly welcomes papers presenting results of national as well as comparative studies on the quality of life of children, papers dealing with related methodological issues, such as the choice of appropriate indicators and the specific challenges of surveying the well-being of children, and not least papers focusing on the differences between the assessment of young people’s and adult’s qualities of life.


Anyone interested in presenting a paper should contact session organizers. Submission deadlines are available at host committee page.