XVII ISA World Congress of Sociology, Sociology on the move, Gothenburg, Sweden, July 2010

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Research Committee on
History of Sociology RC08

Programme Coordinators
Christian Fleck, University of Gratz, Austria, christian.fleck@uni-graz.at
Andreas Hess, University College, Dublin, Ireland, a.hess@ucd.ie

Congress Programme

 

Sessions descriptions


Session 1: Agenda setting for national sociologies
Organizer: Jennifer  Platt, Univesity of Sussex, UK, j.platt@sussex.ac.uk
Attempts have sometimes been made to influence the directions of national sociologies.  These may stem from government agendas which indicate the topics and types of research that are being encouraged - often through the provision of funding opportunities. Internal steering mechanisms within national associations and more general disciplinary contexts of sociology are probably weaker, and any collective sense of directions for sociology may be only slightly developed. Nevertheless there are some mechanisms which may attempt to create an internally-directed set of research questions and approaches: Presidential addresses, editorials, inaugurals and on occasion more explicit agencies such as disciplinary task-forces or submissions concerning policy made to government bodies. Other unintentional means are more indirect, with the effects of cues emanating from book reviews, symposia and disputes. In this session we invite contributions which describe whichever of these mechanisms are pertinent in a particular national context, and assess the extent to which they have in fact affected the direction of sociology in that country.

Session 2: The history of sociology. Part I
Organizer: Cherry Schrecker, University of Nancy, France, cherry.schrecker@univ-nancy2.fr

Session 3: The history of sociology. Part II
Organizer: Cherry Schrecker, University of Nancy, France, cherry.schrecker@univ-nancy2.fr

Session 4: The history of empirical social research and statistics
Organizer: Imelda Georges, Germany, i.gorges@gmx.de

Session 5: The Entangled history of gender and sociology
Organizer: Theresa Wobbe, University of Erfurt, Germany, maria-theresa.wobbe@uni-erfurt.de 
If sociology contributes to an understanding of our world by defining new objects of research and reevaluating its rich heritage, this implies a new openness regarding its own epistemic history. We propose to discuss this historicity with respect to the concepts of gender and sociology as embedded in (trans)national contexts (1870s-1920s). How have gender and sociology emerged in the context of discourses on the social? How has gender been created, while sociology established its distinct set of concepts such as differentiation, law, and society? To which extent do these concepts contribute to the codification of social objects, and how do they invent persons, which then in turn may alter these classifications? To what extent do these concepts reflect both national paths and mutual transnational observations? The aim of the session is to provide a reflexive perspective on the entangled history of gender and sociology. We intend to understand how sociology took part in the scientification of social categories on the one hand, and how these notions have nurtured our gendered imagination of modernity on the other. While the session has its point of departure in the French-German case, further cases are welcome.

Session 6: Public intellectuals
Organizer: Christian Fleck, University of Graz, Austria, christian.fleck@uni-graz.at

Session 7: Sociological perspectives on conceptual and intellectual history. Part I
Organizer: Andreas Hess, University College Dublin, Ireland, a.hess@ucd.ie
Papers in this session will discuss the state of both the traditional (K. Mannheim) and modern forms (R. K. Merton, P. Bourdieu) of practicing the sociology of knowledge. Also, contributions are welcome which discuss the question of whether sociologists can learn something from Cambridge-style intellectual history (Q. Skinner, J.G.A. Pocock, S. Collini) or from conceptual history (as proposed by R. Koselleck).

Session 8: Sociological perspectives on conceptual and intellectual history. Part II
Organizer: Andreas Hess, University College Dublin, Ireland, a.hess@ucd.ie
Papers in this session will discuss the state of both the traditional (K. Mannheim) and modern forms (R. K. Merton, P. Bourdieu) of practicing the sociology of knowledge. Also, contributions are welcome which discuss the question of whether sociologists can learn something from Cambridge-style intellectual history (Q. Skinner, J.G.A. Pocock, S. Collini) or from conceptual history (as proposed by R. Koselleck).

Session 9: Peter Baehr - Annah Arendt (Stanford UP)
Organizer: Charles Crothers, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand, charles.crothers@aut.ac.nz

Session 10: National traditions and trajectories. Part I
Organizer: Christian Fleck, University of Graz, Austria, christian.fleck@uni-graz.at

Session 11: National traditions and trajectories. Part II
Organizer: Christian Fleck, University of Graz, Austria, christian.fleck@uni-graz.at

Session 12: Business Meeting

Session 13: History of sociology in Japan. Part I
Organizer: Kiyomitsu Yui, Kobe University, Japan, k-yui@cf7.so-net.ne.jp
Sociological studies in Japan have a history of roughly 140 years and have reached a level of sophistication similar to that of sociological studies in the West. However, sometimes they tend to be invisible to the rest of the world, mainly because of language barriers. In this session we would like to showcase the latest achievements of mainly young sociologists in various fields of sociological investigations in Japan. We thus hope to contribute to a renewed and more inclusive vision of the history of sociology. We also hope that this session could serve as a reminder that sociology has also had a history in non-Western societies. This session is organized in cooperation with the Japanese Association for the Study of the History of Sociology.

Session 14: History of sociology in Japan. Part II
Organizer: Kiyomitsu Yui, Kobe University, Japan, k-yui@cf7.so-net.ne.jp
Sociological studies in Japan have a history of roughly 140 years and have reached a level of sophistication similar to that of sociological studies in the West. However, sometimes they tend to be invisible to the rest of the world, mainly because of language barriers. In this session we would like to showcase the latest achievements of mainly young sociologists in various fields of sociological investigations in Japan. We thus hope to contribute to a renewed and more inclusive vision of the history of sociology. We also hope that this session could serve as a reminder that sociology has also had a history in non-Western societies. This session is organized in cooperation with the Japanese Association for the Study of the History of Sociology.