XVII ISA World Congress of Sociology, Sociology on the move, Gothenburg, Sweden, July 2010

Menu:

RC homepage

 

Research Committee on
Sociology of Disasters RC39

Programme Coordinators
Joe Scanlon, Carleton University, Canada, jscanlon@ccs.carleton.ca
Lori Peek, Colorado State University, USA, lori.peek@colostate.edu

Congress Programme


Sessions descriptions

Session 1: Disaster dissertations
Organizer: Joe Scanlon, Carleton University, Canada, jscanlon@ccs.carleton.ca
Chair: Dennis Wenger, National Science Foundation, USA, dwenger@nsf.gov
This session will provide an opportunity for doctoral students to present a brief (five minutes maximum) overview of their dissertation research topic. There will be a very short question session after each presentation. The purpose of this session is to make attendees aware of the students and their research topics so they can offer suggestions and advice informally during the rest of the Congress. Students will be scheduled into this session on a first come, first served basis.
           
Session 2: Theory and methodology
Organizer: Wolf Dombrowsky, University of Kiel, Germany,
wdombro@msn.com
Chair: Everett Ressler, UNICEF, eressler@unicef.org
All papers in this session will cover issues related to various theories about disasters, conceptual discussion about what constitutes a disaster, and methodological approaches to studying disaster. While proposals are welcome, it is expected the papers in this session will be invited ones.

Session 3: Scandinavian disaster research
Organizer: Susan Ullberg, CRISMART, Sweden, Susann.Ullberg@fhs.se
Chair: Eve Coles, Coventry University, United Kingdom,
e.coles@coventry.ac.uk
Over the past decade, the study of crisis and disasters has become a significant field of academic study within the Scandinavian social sciences with a growing number of research institutes. This line of research has a fairly long tradition, however, especially in Sweden. This session will include invited presentations by a number of pioneers of disaster and crisis research in Scandinavia, accounting for the history of this field of study as well as for their own research and their views on the future of the field.     

Session 4: African ethnographies in adversity
Organizers: Andrew Collins, Northumbria University, United Kingdom, Andrew.Collins@unn.ac.uk; Bernard Manyena, Northumbria University, United Kingdom, Bernard.manyena@unn.ac.uk
Chair: Walter Peacock, Texas A&M University, USA, peacock@archone.tamu.edu
The African continent is the world’s second largest and second most populous continent. Drought, famine, oil pipeline explosions, the AIDS epidemic, cholera, and an array of other “natural” and “human-caused” disasters have afflicted some of the poorest and most disenfranchised citizens of African nation states. This session, which is a continuation of a discussion began at the World Congress in 2006, will focus on ethnographic studies of disaster in Africa.

Session 5: Vulnerabilities and capacities among at-risk populations
Organizer: Betty Morrow, Consultant, USA, betty@bmorrow.com       
Chair: Bill Lovekamp, Eastern Illinois University, USA, welovekamp@eiu.edu     
Over the past two decades, research on “vulnerable groups” in disaster has grown exponentially. This work has identified women, children, the poor, racial and ethnic minorities, and persons with disability as disadvantaged during all phases of the disaster life cycle. This session will explore the latest research in this area, and also will focus on the capacities of marginalized groups.

Session 6: Additional session on the Congress theme: Peace, conflict, and climate change
Organizer: Ilan Kelman, CICERO, Norway, Ilan_kelman@hotmail.com
Chair: Jim Kendra, University of North Texas, USA, jmkendra@unt.edu            
The disaster of climate change is intertwined with peace and conflict at many levels, from international environmental negotiations to securing resources to assist indigenous communities dealing with the already apparent impacts of climate change. This session will explore these interlinks, in particular to try to separate the hyperbole over climate change causing all witnessed problems from the reality of climate change as exposing vulnerabilities and conflicts that have long simmered but have not been addressed.

Session 7: Business Meeting and Session in Honor of Professor Russell Dynes
Organizer: Ron Perry, Arizona State University, USA, ron.perry@asu.edu
Chair: Lori Peek, Colorado State University, USA, lori.peek@colostate.edu
This session will offer reports from the president and treasurer of Research Committee 39, plus the editors of our journal, International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, and newsletter, Unscheduled Events. This session will also include a special presentation by Dr. William Anderson, in which he will review the contributions of Dr. Russell Dynes to the Sociology of Disaster.

Session 8: Open papers
Organizer: Joe Scanlon, Carleton University, Canada, jscanlon@ccs.carleton.ca
Chair: Sue McNeil, University of Delaware, USA, smcneil@udel.edu
This is an open paper session. Research Committee 39 welcomes papers from any discipline as long as they are in the area of crisis communication, emergency management, or any other aspects of the broad field of disaster studies. Anyone who would like to discuss his/her paper and whether it might be acceptable should communicate with the session organizer.

Session 9: Evacuations and sheltering
Organizer: Lori Peek, Colorado State University, USA, lori.peek@colostate.edu
Chair:  Erna Danielsson, National Defence College, Sweden,
erna.danielsson@fhs.se 
This session will highlight recent research on evacuating and sheltering disaster-affected populations. Papers may explore how to most efficiently and effectively move people out of harm’s way—including, for example, high-rise building occupants, residents of low-lying coastal areas, and children and adults in earthquake stricken regions. Papers may also focus on the effectiveness of short- and longer-term sheltering options for diverse populations. 

Session 10: An ethnographic approach to disasters and risk
Organizer: Sandrine Revet, University de Paris III, France,
sandrine.revet@free.fr
Chair: Avi Kirschenbaum, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel,
avik@tx.technion.ac.il  
There is a growing interest in disasters and risk in the social sciences in Europe, with more scholars using the ethnographic approach to understand risk or disaster situations. This session will feature field work that contributes to analyses of disaster or risk as processes of qualification, or categorization, to identify what is at stake in these situations and to shed light on the contradictory interests held by different actors. The goal of this work is to analyze not only the points of view of the “victims,” but also the interactions between assistance or prevention operations, and the “beneficiary” population. In crisis situations, various social worlds converge: medical and assistance professionals, politicians, the media, academic experts, affected populations, national and international spheres, and so forth. This session will consider how these different actors meet on the disaster scene, and what transformations occur across the disaster lifecycle.

Session 11: Open papers
Organizer: Joe Scanlon, Carleton University, Canada, jscanlon@ccs.carleton.ca
Chair: Carla Prater, Texas A&M University, USA, Carla@archone.tamu.edu
This is an open paper session. Research Committee 39 welcomes papers from any discipline as long as they are in the area of crisis communication, emergency management, or any other aspects of the broad field of disaster studies. Anyone who would like to discuss his/her paper and whether it might be acceptable should communicate with the session organizer.

Session 12: Catastrophic events
Organizer:  Lori Peek, Colorado State University, USA, lori.peek@colostate.edu
Chair: Michael Lindell, Texas A&M University, USA,
mlindell@archmail.tamu.edu
Catastrophes are of a different scale than more routine emergencies or disasters. Catastrophes tend to affect multiple communities, damage or destroy most or all of the built environment, overwhelm local capacities, and disrupt everyday routines for long periods of time. Recent events, including Hurricane Katrina in the United States, the Sichuan, China Earthquake, and the Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami illustrate the tremendous challenges associated with preparing for, responding to, and recovering from catastrophes. This session will highlight recent research on the social impacts of catastrophic events.

Session 13: Open papers
Organizer: Joe Scanlon, Carleton University, Canada, jscanlon@ccs.carleton.ca
Chair: Larry Pearce, Canada, larrypearce@shaw.ca
This is an open paper session. Research Committee 39 welcomes papers from any discipline as long as they are in the area of crisis communication, emergency management, or any other aspects of the broad field of disaster studies. Anyone who would like to discuss his/her paper and whether it might be acceptable should communicate with the session organizer.

Session 14: Open Papers
Organizer: Joe Scanlon, Carleton University, Canada, jscanlon@ccs.carleton.ca
Chair: Andrew Coghlan, Emergency Management Australia,
acoghlan@bigpond.com  
This is an open paper session. Research Committee 39 welcomes papers from any discipline as long as they are in the area of crisis communication, emergency management, or any other aspects of the broad field of disaster studies. Anyone who would like to discuss his/her paper and whether it might be acceptable should communicate with the session organizer.