Integrative Sessions


Integrative Sessions are semi-plenary sessions which connect at least three Research Committees, at least three National Associations, or a combination involving at least three RCs and NAs around a debate on a common theme.

A list of the approved Integrative Sessions proposals:

10 best proposals

for Integrative Sessions which will be held parallel during the morning semi-plenary blocs of time, 12:30-13:50, Monday-Friday, July 14-18, 2014

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Addressing Inequality Before, During and after Difficult Times: Research, Intervention and Effective Outcomes

Session Organizers

Sesion Coordinator
Jan Marie FRITZ, W. Wilson International Center for Scholars, USA, jan.fritz@uc.edu

Not open for submission of abstracts.
This session will bring together scholars and scholar-practitioners from two national associations and two ISA research divisions to discuss the different perspectives on how inequality has been or can be effectively addressed in past, present and future research, intervention and combined research/ intervention projects in different parts of the world.

Taking into account the different perspectives in their organizations, the projects will be critically analyzed by the panel and, with the help of those in the audience, facilitators and barriers to effective outcomes will be identified and discussed. Topics to be covered include: evidence-based practice; explicitly including rights frameworks in research and intervention work; multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to research and intervention; and the extent to which sociologists are involved in interventions in different parts of the world.

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Crisis, Transnational Migration, and the Gender Order in Europe

Session Organizers

Session Coordinators

Not open for submission of abstracts.
The focus of this integrative session is on the ways in which European societies, in the midst of ongoing socio-economic crisis, encounter and deal with new transnational migration flows, mainly of women and young people without prospects in their home countries. What is the impact of transnational migration and consequent transnational family arrangements, in the context of socio-economic crisis, on gender relations and the gender order across European societies? The latter are dealing with the dual challenge of the new role of women entering the globalized world of flexible, de-regulated work on the one hand, and the shortage of the labour supply for reproductive work according to the dominant gender order, on the other.


New migratory patterns and behaviors of marginalized persons and groups are being developed as means to achieve self-inclusion. Among feminists there is a consensus that inequality is gendered in terms of civil, social, and political citizenship rights. Different modes of women's inclusion into citizenship, both as a status and a practice, have been identified in different citizenship regimes. In migratory circumstances new patterns of behavior, biographical prospects, family arrangements and community building are being developed, challenged by inclusion into citizenship both as a status and a practice in different citizenship regimes.

Questions that this session addresses include but are not limited to:

 

Monday, July 14, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Emerging Society and Sociological Discourse in BRICS Countries

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator
Valery MANSUROV, Russian Academy of Science,  Russia, mansurov@isras.ru

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS), despite their divergent pasts, are relocating themselves in the new world economic, political and social system. All the five countries are influenced by and play leadership roles in relation to other countries in their respective economic, social and cultural arenas, and similarly they have a presence in the other parts of the world. A process of economic transition and ideological reconciliation is common to the BRICS countries. BRICS is an idea, a formation and a reality in-the-making. It has yet to crystallize its form, shape and functioning. In terms of trained and skilled manpower, burgeoning middle class, market economy, and competition with the USA and West Europe, the BRICS have already become an acknowledged reality.

The BRICS can be in the forefront of a new dialogue on development and change as they represent a semblance of tradition and modernity, uniqueness and global character, self–realization and wider participation, autonomy and interdependence. BRICS can also question the hegemony of the West in economic, political and intellectual domains, by creating new structures and processes of economy, political institutions and centers of creativity and intellectual excellence.

The problematic is, thus, for the socio-economic and political space for the BRICS countries in the post-globalization era. The BRICS can highlight their commonalities vis-à-vis the western world, and also discuss their specific socio-political and economic formations. As such, the proposed integrative session will discuss not only the nature and character of the emerging society in BRICS countries but also the sociological discourse in response to the above.

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Inequality and the Future of Aging: Global and Comparative Perspectives on Trends, Implications, Policies, and Practices

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator
Julia ROZANOVA, University of British Columbia, Canada, julia.rozanova@ubc.ca

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Population aging is considered among the top three challenges of global development by the United Nations. By 2025 one in every seven Americans, one in six Canadians, one in five Japanese and Europeans (in some European regions such as Germany or Italy one in four) will be over the age of 65. This historically unique global transition towards ageing societies will affect almost all countries before the end of the century. But what will this revolutionary change mean for sociology and for society?

The three Research Committees will lead an integrative reflection on long-term future theory, policy, and practice implications of aging societies, dispelling common myths and stereotypes and pointing out problems that are largely ignored. Papers will both present cases contextualized in particular societies and make international comparisons to address questions that cut across the three Committees' research agendas:

 

Friday, July 18, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Players and Arenas: Strategic Dynamics of Politics and Protest

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator
James JASPER, City University of New York, USA, jjasper@gc.cuny.edu

Not open for submission of abstracts.
In recent years pejorative psychological theories of social movements and the structural theories that replaced them have both been dislodged by perspectives that take the point of view of participants seriously, with improved understandings of what protestors want. But this cultural sensitivity must still be linked with the strategic interactions between protestors and a number of other players who can help or hinder them. This session would promote this emerging strategic approach by combining insights from the structural and cultural paradigms while focusing on decisions and actions. It has the potential to profoundly transform theories of local politics and protest.

Integrative Rationale: Similar strategic dynamics can be found in many social institutions, but especially among organized politics, protest, and markets. An integrative session would allow experts on different arenas to perceive similar strategic tradeoffs and dilemmas in their respective realms.

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Precarious Work and Employment Risks in East Asia

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator
Karen A. SHIRE, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany, karen.shire@uni-due.de, RC02 Economy and Society

Not open for submission of abstracts.
The panel addresses the impact of work-based insecurities and rising social inequalities within and across nations, with a specific regional focus on East Asia. Standing's work shows that precarious work involves an interaction of seven dimensions of economic insecurities, pointing to the need for an integrated understanding of the link between precarious work and social inequalities.

The integrated panel enables a focus on multiple insecurities and how they interact to produce precarious work relations, in reference to working conditions and the experience of social exclusion (RC30 Work), the links between de-regulation, liberalization and the individualization of employment risks (RC02 Economy and Society), but also the development of interest representation and social organizations for supporting labor market outsiders (RC44 Labor Movements).

The location of the ISA Conference in Yokohama is an opportunity to highlight Asian sociologists and the specific regional contexts of precarious work, to discuss issues, such as Sen's thesis, that Japan is a model for other Asian economies in achieving social inclusion, or the loss of social protections through the decline of state-owned enterprises, as well as the intersection of inequalities generated by internal and foreign migration

 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Social Network and Social Capital in East Asian Societies: China, South Korea, Taiwan and Japan

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Contributing to the hotly debated concept of social capital, we develop an East Asian conceptual framework of network social capital for EASS 2012 module. East Asian Social Survey is a biennial social survey project that purports to produce and disseminate academic survey data sets in East Asia.

As a cross-national network of GSS-type surveys, Chinese General Social Survey, Japanese General Social Survey, Korean General Social Survey, and Taiwan Social Change Survey teams worked together to make a family module in 2006, a culture module in 2008, and a health module in 2010. The core idea for the EASS 2012 module is that East Asians are the cultural creators of social networking. This means that East Asians are both heavily dependent upon their interpersonal networks for social engagement and social trust, among other forms of social action, and make considerable instrumental and emotional efforts in cultivating new ties in order to expand, adjust, and enrich network social capital.

The EASS 2012 module is consisted of three parts: Social Networks assessing potential and mobilized social capital, Social Engagement assessing behavioral dynamics and outcomes, and Social Trust assessing community-level dynamics and outcomes of social capital. The following speakers will examine the generalization of the hypothesized interrelationships among these measures using the EASS 2012data set.

 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

The Global Migration of Gendered Care Work. Part II

Session Organizers

Session Coordinators

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Care work, a form of unpaid and paid labour performed primarily by women, is a major site of job growth across both the developing and developed world. The increasing demand for care workers in a variety of sectors – from private homes to long-term elder care facilities to public hospitals – has contributed to the global migration of care workers.

Transnational flows of women workers, especially from poorer migrant-sending countries to wealthier migrant-receiving countries, raise critical questions about the dynamics of new forms of inequality, subordination and commodification associated with globalized care chains.

To investigate the intersecting avenues of inquiry among gender, political economy, migration, social inequality, labor movements, and work, this integrative session draws on academic and community researchers from three primary Research Committees (RC44, RC02, RC3).

We will also seek paper presenters and dialogue with research committees that are also engaged in this area of inquiry, including RC19, the Research Committee on Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy, and RC31, Research Committee on Migration.


Friday, July 18, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

The Global South and Postcolonial Perspectives in International Sociology

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator
Raewyn CONNELL, University of Sydney, Australia, raewyn.connell@sydney.edu.au

Not open for submission of abstracts.
The ISA is the bearer of a great prospect for sociology: becoming a genuinely international field of knowledge. A powerful contemporary change is the emergence of postcolonial and southern perspectives. Sociology's history is being re-thought; the economy of knowledge centred on Europe and North America is being analyzed; more complex international flows of ideas are being traced.

"Postcolonial sociology" is not a new specialization: it is a shift that affects all fields of sociology. Postcolonial perspectives are currently being explored in sociological theory, the sociologies of disability, education, gender and modernization, the history of sociology, and more.

This session responds to this moment in the ISA's history, providing a forum to link postcolonial perspectives emerging in different areas of the ISA's work. The session will allow researchers to compare changes in their own fields, and discuss the implications for world sociology.

Speakers will be asked to respond to a set of questions posed by the participating ISA units. Through the contact persons, units will be asked to propose issues about postcolonial and southern perspectives for discussion at the session. These will be redacted by the contact persons and the coordinator, and given (well in advance) to the speakers.

The session is intended to be interactive. The Chairperson will pose questions to the speakers, based on the agreed agenda, and invite debate as well as direct statements. In the second half of the session, contributions (time-limited) from the floor will be invited, involving exchange with speakers on the panel. At the end of the session, the speakers will offer short closing statements.

With this format, we cannot list 'themes' individually for speakers. Possible themes are: innovations within specific fields of sociology; postcolonial curricula for teaching sociology; new audiences across the majority world; relations between sociology and indigenous knowledge.

 

Monday, July 14, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Wither the 2011 Mobilizations: Progressive, Regressive or Irrelevant

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator

Not open for submission of abstracts.
In 2011, the self-immolation of a Tunisian fruit peddler ignited a massive protest against the government that not only led to new leadership, but inspired protests throughout the MENA region.  This was followed by similar protests over sovereign debt crises in Southern Europe and then the Occupy Wall Street movements.

These protests were rooted in Neo-liberal globalization, growing inequality, injustice, poverty and limited mobility, while retrenchments of State services and benefits adversely impacted a wide range of actors. Young, often college educated activists played significant roles in organizing mobilizations and publicizing them throughout the world via ICT and social media. Moreover, a growing precariat has become a major factor for these movements.

At this point, there are two major questions that need to be considered. What has been the impact of these movements that might be considered moments of a longer cycle of global justice movements? While articulating anger, alienation and indignation, have there been any genuine changes?   

Secondly, these movements have required a rethinking of social movement theorizations, especially since the predominant paradigms, RM and/or NSM do not really grasp these movements, especially since they are rooted in political-economic crises of legitimacy. While collective identity has played a major role in these movements, NSM theories have not paid much attention to the role of emotions and constellations of emotions that motivate and sustain mobilizations. At the ISA Forum, these movements were widely discussed. A number of RCs had panels concerned with these questions, especially RC 36 and 48 that held some joint sessions, while 07 also addressed these issues from a futures perspective.

Given the importance of these movements in impacting the political, as well as the extent to which we must advance our frameworks of understanding, we therefore propose an integrated session that would bring diverse, but complimentary frameworks to consider the consequences of these movements. 

 

 

2 Integrative Sessions

to be included under National Associations’ sessions time slots 15:30-17:20 on Monday-Friday, July 14-18, 2014:

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 12:30 PM - 01:50 PM

Economic Regionalization and Social Inequality in East Asia

Session Organizers

Session Coordinator

Not open for submission of abstracts.
In the last decade, the cross-border economy in East Asia shows the processes of globalization and regionalization occurring simultaneously, and the fast increasing economic exchanges with China for Taiwan, Korea, and Japan have been the most significant phenomena of economic regionalization in this area.

The challenges of this regionalization trend are great number of investments and jobs go to China and social inequality among individuals and regions have been continuously increasing in Taiwan and in some other East Asian countries. Some studies or discourses imply that this new trend of economic regionalization is related to the social problems of high unemployment rates and low wages for college graduates and young adults in Taiwan and other countries in the world as well.

The social inequality due to economic concentration to China varies among East Asia countries, and this trend of world market to China even makes the inequality worse in China. Different governments  already noticed these problems of social inequities and proposed different policies in order to ameliorate them recently. For example, the Obama administration's incentives for returning manufacturing jobs back to the United States or Taiwanese government has the "Salmon Return Back" policy to lure mainland-based Taiwanese businesses to invest more at home.

We propose this integrative session in order to bring more research exchanges and discusses on the following emerging research questions:

  1. What's the spatial-temporal evolution of economic exchanges and variations of growing inequalities in East Asian societies?
  2. How do the increasing trend of concentration on China in terms of export and import values for Taiwan, Korea and Japan associate with the social and regional inequality in domestic labor market in respective society?
  3. What are the institutional policies to deal with the social inequality problems due to the new trend of economic regionalization in East Asia.

 

Monday, July 14, 2014: 03:30 PM - 05:20 PM

Japanese-Brazilians from Global Sociological Perspectives

Session Organizers

Session Coordinators

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Today, relations between Brazil and Japan are played out at many levels, from the micro to the macro. From the early 20th century Brazil received large numbers of Japanese migrants as a result it is nowadays home to the largest Japanese community outside the Japan, estimated in 1,5 million.

Since the second half of the 1980s, they made the reverse movement to Japan. More than 300,000 of them work and live in Japan on a permanent basis, a new generation of Brazilians has been born in Japan and, beyond the day-to-day solidarity and conflicts, they challenge Japanese society and its public policy to respond to the question: how to deal with foreigners? Brazilians became Japan's third largest group of foreigners.

From 2008, when the world financial crises resulted in job losses, one third these Brazilians returned home. Many of them face great difficu lties as they try to reinsert themselves in the labor market. Ironically 2008 saw the Centennial celebrations of the Japanese immigration to Brazil, and resulted in great visibility for Japan-Brazil relations. One result of the strength of these relations has been the implementation of many bilateral agreements.

Meanwhile, power relations in the global setting have been changing over recent years, and are now quite different to those found last century. For instance, Brazil is now classified as an "emerging country", however extreme social inequalities persist. The proposed session will reflect on migration as a possible vector of expression of multicultural exchanges (Maruyama); verify the concrete experience of migrants as a part of a larger process of not only economic globalization (Mita and Ishikawa), but also as populational flows and social networks (Sasaki), especially by treating contradictory perspectives, as posed by Sayad (1998). This research can make an original contribution to Global Sociology (Hirano).

 

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International Sociological Association
June 2014