ISA World Congress of Sociology, Yokohama, Japan, July 2014

Research Committee on
Sociology of Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy, RC19

RC19 main page

Program Coordinator

Number of allocated sessions including Business Meeting: 22.

 

For sessions program and schedule see

On-line congress program

 

Children: Inequality and Rights

Session Organizers
Joan E. DURRANT, University of Manitoba, Canada, joan.durrant@umanitoba.ca
Gregg M. OLSEN, University of Manitoba, Canada, gregg.olsen@umanitoba.ca

Session in English

The Convention on the Rights of the Child was adopted by the United Nations in 1989. Since then, all nations of the world but two have ratified it, committing themselves to implementing its standards universally and without discrimination. Yet, globally an average of 25,000 children under 5 die each day from poverty-related causes; 67 million children of primary school age are still denied the right to education; and 150 million children are engaged in child labour (UNICEF, 2009). Wide disparities exist across regions in the implementation of children’s rights to survival and development. But marked disparities in the fulfillment of children’s rights also exist within nations, linked to geographical location, ethnicity, gender, disability, and access to essential services such as health care, nutrition and education.

What can be done to raise the level of implementation of child rights standards around the world? This session will focus on rights-based approaches to reducing inequalities among children. Papers from all regions of the world are welcome, and may focus on child rights indicators, child-rights-based methodologies, and policy measures that reduce disparities in children’s health and well-being.

 

Gender and Welfare State Redesign: Work, Care and Social Citizenship

Session Organizer
Mi Young AN, Kookmin University, Korea, myan@kookmin.ac.kr

Session in English

Normative ideals and pragmatic responses have changed in recent welfare reforms in Europe and East Asia, albeit to a different extent. The reforms have recast work/care paradigm which have permitted repositioning of concepts such as rights, responsibilities and redistributions. While there have been widely developed discussions on the subject matter for European welfare states, scholarly endevours have been weakly developed for East Asia. Indeed, comparisons between European and East Asian societies have remained preliminary analytical thoughts.

Thus, this session develops a line of discussions, by inviting papers on how recent welfare reforms in Europe and East Asia have reshaped work/care regime and its implications on social citizenships.

 

Global Social Policy and the International Development Agenda

Session Organizers
Alexandra KAASCH, University of Bremen, Germany, alexandra.kaasch@zes.uni-bremen.de
Rianne MAHON, Carleton University, Canada, rmahon@ccs.carleton.ca

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Global social policy, particularly in its dimension of global social redistribution, has long been concerned with the links between social policy and development policies. Currently, debates on the nature a post-MDG agenda are in full swing, as the Millennium Development Goals are due to end in 2015.

This panel invites papers that critically assess the current development agenda in this light of it potential to realise a more egalitarian world.

 

Intergenerational Relations

Session Organizer
Joakim PALME, Uppsala University, Sweden, joakim.palme@statsvet.uu.se

Session in English

Demographic changes is now a universal issue for all societies. What are the implications of demographic changes on intergenerational relations and social and economic policies.

This session invites papers that would examine the issue of intergeneration relations from wide range of perspectives.

 

Marketization in Welfare State Policies and New Social Cleavages

Session Organizers
Patricia FRERICKS, University of Hamburg, Germany, patricia.frericks@uni-hamburg.de
Birgit PFAU-EFFINGER, University of Hamburg, Germany, pfau-effinger@sozialwiss.uni-hamburg.de

Session in English

In the 1990s, a shift in welfare state policies took place which emphasized market principles and reduced other steering principles. This development is called marketization of welfare state policies: markets have been established in welfare state institutions and policies in which market principles such as competition, contractual relations and exchange had not played a major role before. The marketization in welfare states encompasses the construction of elements of social security and social services as goods which can be sold and purchased on markets. Welfare states thereby have established welfare-, quasi- or social-markets, they have introduced competition of suppliers and strengthened the role of for-profit suppliers. Concurrently, the socio-political concept of the social citizen (T.H. Marshall 1950) started to be modified towards the concept of an “active” social citizen whose rights to social security and social services strongly depend on so-called self-responsibility.

This development, however, is far from being linear; it is characterized by contradictions, diversity and opposing tendencies.

This political reorientation suggested solutions to reduce costs and to increase efficiency of welfare state policies. However, it has also let to various unintended consequences among which are the increased social inequality which is partly not transparent and the emergence or intensification of new conflicts.

 

New Inequality and Social Exclusion

Session Organizer
Ito PENG, University of Toronto, Canada, itopeng@chass.utoronto.ca

Session in English

There has been a noticeable increase in social and economic inequalities since the beginning of the 2000s. This has led to greater and new forms of social exclusion.

This session welcomes papers that will examine new inequality and social exclusion in both developed and developing countries, and what that means in terms of policies.

 

Old and New Politics of Global Social Policy

Session Organizers
Alexandra KAASCH, University of Bremen, Germany, alexandra.kaasch@zes.uni-bremen.de
Rianne MAHON, Carleton University, Canada, rmahon@ccs.carleton.ca

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
There has been a significant increase of global social policy actors and fora, that the global economic and financial crisis only served to intensify. This has resulted in an ever more complex system of overlapping agencies and institutions, and the proliferation of alternative solutions (Deacon 2007).

This panel brings together papers that illuminate the role of diverse social policy actors, operating at different scales and explore their changing positions in global social policy debates.

 

Open Session

Session Organizer
Ito PENG, University of Toronto, Canada, itopeng@chass.utoronto.ca

Session in English

This session is open for all kinds of papers from members of RC19.

 

Poverty, Social Welfare, and Outcomes of Children

Session Organizer
Chien-Chung HUANG, Rutgers University, USA, chuang@ssw.rutgers.edu

Session in English

This session welcome empirical papers examine effects of poverty on outcomes of children and investigate the extent of social welfare policy and programs on alleviating the effects of poverty and outcomes of children.

The session especially encourages comparative studies, examining effects of poverty and social welfare on children in different cities, regions, and/or countries.

 

RC19 Business Meeting



 

Restructuring Care Policies

Session Organizer
Ito PENG, University of Toronto, Canada, itopeng@chass.utoronto.ca

Session in English

Demographic and social changes have put the issue of care in the focus of social policy development in a wide range of countries around the world, and this includes both long-term care and child care. Local/national care policies have been restructured and shaped by transnational ideas. The new emergent care policies are strongly interrelated with new forms of professional governance and changes in the care workforce, including gender arrangements that, in turn, may have complex and contradictory consequences for professional development.

This session aims to contribute to the debates by bridging research into changing national care policies and their international embeddedness with research into professional governance and development in the care sector. We invite papers that address these issues in both long-term care respectively child care.

 

Social Investment in East Asia

Session Organizer
Bruno PALIER, Sciences Po, France, bruno.palier@sciences-po.fr

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Japan, Taiwan, South Korea more or less share a tradition of a strong involvement of the State within economic development; Recently, these countries have expanded their social intervention, but not really in the European traditional welfare state manner, and more endorsing a productive welfare orientation. Social investment ideas have been development in different ways in all three countries.

This panel will present and compare the various ways social investment polices have developed in this region of the globe.

 

Social Investment in Latin America and the Caribbean

Session Organizers
Bruno PALIER, Sciences Po, France, bruno.palier@sciences-po.fr
Evelyne HUBER, University of North Carolina, USA, ehuber@ad.unc.edu

Session in English

The American Continent has been a place of great social innovation under the recent left wing turn. Borsa Familia is the most well-known measure typically investing in childhood education, but others initiative can be associated with the social investment perspective.

This session would compare and analyze these developments in Central and Latin America.

 

Social Policy and the Crisis

Session Organizer
Joakim PALME, Uppsala University, Sweden, joakim.palme@statsvet.uu.se

Session in English

How has the 2008 financial crisis affect social policies? This session welcomes papers that examine the impacts, implications, and outcomes of crisis on social policy, and the relationship between social policy and the crisis.

 

Social Welfare, Policy and Outcomes: The Ethnic Minority Experience in a Global and Comparative Perspective

Session Organizer
Reza HASMATH, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, rhasmath@gmail.com

Session in English

This panel assesses social welfare policies and/or the realized outcomes of such policies through the prism of the life course experiences of the ethnic minority cohort.

Papers that address salient themes such as education, labour market, health, social security, and poverty (broadly construed) are welcomed. Moreover, papers that specifically examine the ethnic minority experiences in a comparative perspective are encouraged.

 

The Changing Politics of Social Policy

Session Organizer
Daniel BELAND, Canada Research in Public Policy, Canada, daniel.beland@usask.ca

Session in English

This session explores how politics of social policy has changed and is changing across the world.

 

The Politics and Policies of Social Investment in Europe

Session Organizers
Bruno PALIER, Sciences Po, France, bruno.palier@sciences-po.fr
John D. STEPHENS, University of North Carolina, USA, jdsteph@unc.edu

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Since the late 1990s, and ideas and policies aiming at transforming the welfare state architecture have been developed. From the rediscovery of the workline in Nordic countries, the focus on ECEC in most countries to the third way approach, new ideas and policies have developed. What is the content and driver of such social and labour market policies transformations? Can one find the traditional welfare regime distinction between the various ways ncountries have implemented social investment ideas? What are the politics of such social policy reforms?

This(these) panel(s) aims at understanding the undergoing changes in welfare states in Europe, through the lens of the social investment paradigm.

 

The Reorientation of Social Policy: Putting New Redistributive Strategies to the Test

Session Organizers
Ive MARX, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, Belgium, ive.marx@ua.ac.be
Wim VAN LANCKER, University of Antwerp, Belgium, wim.vanlancker@ua.ac.be

Session in English

The aim of this session is to empirically explore the consequences and impact of new redistributive strategies on social inclusion outcomes.

This stream welcomes papers that put to scrutiny policies that are currently being advocated as new and effective strategies against inequality and poverty. We particularly welcome comparative papers that are empirically grounded, and encourage contributions on non-European countries.

 

Transforming Familialism: Care Regimes in the 21st Century Asia

Session Organizer
Emiko OCHIAI, Kyoto University, Japan, emikoo2@aol.com

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
This panel is based on aninternational joint research project on care in Asia conducted by Asian scholarswith a special focus on recent changes in the 2000s.Our research questionis whether familialism in Asia is changing.To answer this question, we employ quantitative methods, particularly time use analyses, trying to overcome the shortcomings of data in the Asian region, at the same time as reviewing institutional changes in each country.The major findings are the increasing importance of care migration both across national borders and within country as well as the emphasis onthe role of communityin various forms, in spite of growing state intervention.

We also compare policychanges in transitional socialist countries in Asia with post-socialist countries in Europe. The panel consists of 5 papers as follows.

 

Joint Sessions

Click on the session title to read its description and the scheduled day/time.

Healthcare Systems and Health Inequalities

Joint session of RC15 Sociology of Health and RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee]

 

Restructuring Care Policies and (Re-)Making Care Professions

Joint session of RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy and RC52 Sociology of Professional Groups [host committee]

 

Social Policies, Work and Gender: New Forms of Social Work

Joint session of RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee] and RC30 Sociology of Work

 

The Global Migration of Gendered Care Work. Part I

Joint session of RC02 Economy and Society , RC19 Poverty, Social Welfare and Social Policy [host committee] and RC44 Labor Movements

 

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June 2014