ISA World Congress of Sociology, Yokohama, Japan, July 2014

Research Committee on
Comparative Sociology, RC20

RC20 main page

Program Coordinator

Number of allocated sessions including Business Meeting: 18.

 

Planned sessions and dates/time subject to further changes

in alphabetical order:

 

Friday, July 18, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

Changing Global Values. Part I

Session Organizers
Marita CARBALLO, Universidad Católica Argentina, Argentina, marita@maritacarballo.com.ar
Frederick C. TURNER, University of Connecticut, USA, frederick.turner@uconn.edu

Session in English

Papers should be based on survey data on values, either in one nation or among several nations. The emphasis should be on how values have changed over the past decade and what the implications of these changes in values may be.

 

Friday, July 18, 2014: 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Changing Global Values. Part II

Session Organizer
Marita CARBALLO, Universidad Católica Argentina, Argentina, marita@maritacarballo.com.ar
Frederick C. TURNER, University of Connecticut, USA, frederick.turner@uconn.edu

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Comparative Sociology: Present Status and Future Directions

Session Organizer
Masamichi SASAKI, Chuo University, Japan, masasaki@tamacc.chuo-u.ac.jp

Session in English

Sociology`s founding fathers were all comparative researchers, firmly committed to the comparative method, whether studying roles, institutions, societies, nations, cultures, groups, or organizations. As the major aim of comparative sociology is to identify similarities and differences between social entities, this session seeks to compare and contrast nations, cultures, societies, and institutions, as well as develop concepts and generalizations based upon identified similarities and differences among the social entities being compared, especially in their characteristic ways of thinking and acting, in their characteristic attitudes, values and ideologies, and in the intrinsic elements of their social structures, which in turn all serve as a means to enhance understanding and awareness of other social entities.

While the purposes of comparative sociology are many, one key task is to support and contribute to theory formation. While theoretical frameworks drive the construction of comparative research endeavors, the results of such research often drive theory re-formation. Another key task is to support policymaking, and yet another is to ascertain whether the same dimension of a given concept (e.g., religious commitment) can be used as a common social indicator. Does a given concept generalize to all nations (or other social entities)?

As the world becomes ever more globalized, the need for such understanding should be clear: national policies need to consider the needs of all global partners. Why are nations different on some characteristic parameters, while they are the same on others? The same question can be asked of other sets of socio-cultural groupings, both across regional boundaries and within national or ethnic boundaries.

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 07:30 PM - 08:50 PM

Culture and the Media in a Long-Term Perspective

Session Organizers
Robert VAN KRIEKEN, University of Sydney, Australia, robert.van-krieken@sydney.edu.au
Stephen VERTIGANS, Robert Gordon University, United Kingdom, s.vertigans@rgu.ac.uk

Session in English

Cultural forms of behaviour, glorification of celebrity and standards of media reporting are increasingly of cause for political and civil concern. Conversely apologists for the freedom of the press are often the most fervent opponents to shifting forms of cultural and sexual expression.

In this session emergent facets of cultural norms and values and the evolution or regression of media reporting are explored through historical developments. Part of the session will be allocated to analysis of the apparent contradictions between demands for personal freedom and attempts to restrain the cultural opportunities of others.

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 05:30 PM - 07:20 PM

Current Research in Comparative Sociology. Part I

Session Organizer
Hanno SCHOLTZ, University of Fribourg, Switzerland, hanno.scholtz@unifr.ch

Session in English

This session welcomes original papers in the field of Comparative Sociology.

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 03:30 PM - 05:20 PM

Current Research in Comparative Sociology. Part II

Session Organizer
Frederick C. TURNER, University of Connecticut, USA, frederick.turner@uconn.edu

Session in English

This session welcomes original papers in the field of Comparative Sociology.

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 05:30 PM - 07:20 PM

Current Research in Comparative Sociology. Part III

Session Organizer
Jean Pascal DALOZ, Université de Strasbourg, France, jean-pascal.daloz@misha.fr

Session in English

This session welcomes original papers in the field of Comparative Sociology.

 

Saturday, July 19, 2014: 02:30 PM - 04:20 PM

Expatriates: Comparative Perspectives

Session Organizer
Jean-Pascal DALOZ, Université de Strasbourg, France, jean-pascal.daloz@misha.fr

Session in English

There are many social scientists to convey a deductive vision in terms of supranational elites exceeding parochial solidarities whereas the bulk of the people is understood as being lured by local identifications. Despite the picture, readily conjured up in the literature on ‘expatriates’, of transnational groups endowed with a cosmopolitan culture overriding all parochial differences, and ostensibly at ease everywhere, the question arises to what extent ‘expatriates’ with various national background differ in terms of attitudes.

This session aims at gathering sociologists with expertise on such populations with a view to generate discussions of a comparative nature.

 

Friday, July 18, 2014: 03:30 PM - 05:20 PM

RC20 Business Meeting




 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

Rethinking Comparison in a Global Age: Methodological Issues

Session Organizers
Vincenzo CICCHELLI, Université Paris Descartes, France, vcicchelli@msh-paris.fr
Sylvie OCTOBRE, Ministère de la Culture, France, sylvie.octobre@culture.gouv.fr

Session in English

Comparative research is as old as the discipline of sociology itself. We still witness works that seem to assume that social phenomena are nationally determined, culturally homogenous and relatively stable in the countries being compared. We know that the current process of globalisation definitely challenges such a vision. For we social scientists, however, the question also arises to what extent our comparative methods should be revised accordingly.

This session looks for papers dealing with methodological issues raised by the challenge of globalisation. Approaches may be theoretical (e.g. on the limits of grand theories with universalistic ambitions) as well as empirical (e.g. case studies emphasising the complexities of interactions between societies and how this questions the validity of consecrated methods).

 

Saturday, July 19, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

Rethinking Social Distinction? Panel Session

Session Organizer
Jean-Pascal Daloz, Université de Strasbourg, France, jean-pascal.daloz@misha.fr

Session in English

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM

The Rise of Top Incomes: Comparative Perspectives

Session Organizer
David WEAKLIEM, University of Connecticut, USA, weakliem@uconn.edu

Session in English

In the past few decades, income inequality – specifically, the concentration of income at the top – has grown in many, although not all, advanced capitalist nations. The proposed session would include papers about the causes and consequences of this development. Both empirical and theoretical papers would be welcome.

 

Saturday, July 19, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

Trust: Comparative Perspectives. Part I

Session Organizer
Masamichi SASAKI, Chuo University, Japan, masasaki@tamacc.chuo-u.ac.jp

Session in English

No one denies the importance of trust in social relationships. Many scholars view trust as extraordinarily important because of its influence on interpersonal and group relationships. Our economic system is in many ways entirely dependent upon trust because if there were no trust there would be no economic transactions. Thus trust has profound implications for interpersonal and social cooperation. Without trust, societies really could not exist. As we all know, social systems are becoming increasingly complex and confounded, meaning that trust plays an ever-increasingly important role.

Trust in interpersonal and social cooperation implies commitment, which is intimately tied to obligation, which brings into play basic norms and values at individual and group levels. Norms and values speak to expectations. Expectations are implicit in trust because past and present individual and social behaviors dictate how future actions will unfold. Trust becomes a coping mechanism for societal complexity as it helps to overcome the accompanying uncertainty characteristic of a mushrooming globalized social system.

This session will focus on cross-national perspectives of social trust from micro to macro levels of analysis.

 

Saturday, July 19, 2014: 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Trust: Comparative Perspectives. Part II

Session Organizer
Masamichi SASAKI, Chuo University, Japan, masasaki@tamacc.chuo-u.ac.jp

Session in English

 

Joint Sessions

Click on the session title to read its description and the scheduled day/time.

The Comparative Sociology of Examinations. Part I

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC20 Comparative Sociology [host committee]

 

The Comparative Sociology of Examinations. Part II

Joint session of RC04 Sociology of Education and RC20 Comparative Sociology [host committee]

 

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March 2014