ISA World Congress of Sociology, Yokohama, Japan, July 2014

Thematic Group on
Visual Sociology, WG03

WG03 main page

Program Coordinator

Number of allocated sessions including Business Meeting: 18.

 

Proposed sessions

in alphabetical order:

 

Friday, July 18, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

Exploring Visual Sphere of Youth

Session Organizer
Dennis ZUEV, University Institute of Lisboa, Portugal, tungus66@gmail.com

Session in English

The panel seeks papers dedicated to the application of visual sociological methods in youth studies. We are inviting papers in two broad lines: the use of visual by youth and the use of visual methodologies for studying youth.

We address the following questions related to the use of images by young people: How young people produce and circulate images? How do young people use images online and offline, what are the practices of visual production in the Social Networking Sites? How do they navigate in the visual sphere in different cultural and political contexts. How do images help in the self-transformation and transition to adulthood stages? How do emerging visual worlds radicalize and politicize youth? What is the meaning of visual activism and political performance for youth? What are the iconic images of modern youth?

The second line of exploration is the challenges and hidden nuances of visual methods in youth studies. Here we invite papers reflecting on techniques of collecting, producing and analyzing visual data relevant for youth studies. What issues can be best addressed by using the visual methods? What challenges are in using visual methods when researching youth? What added value can visual data give for youth sociologists? What techniques of visual sociology help to capture and elucidate acute youth problems? Do participatory video and photo-documentation techniques help to delve deeper in understanding youth?

We especially welcome theoretically rich and empirically-based papers. Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference).

 

Monday, July 14, 2014: 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM

Film Making, Photography, and Performative Understandings of Method

Session Organizers
Andrea DOUCET, Brock University, Canada, andreadoucet@mac.com
Natasha MAUTHNER, University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom, n.mauthner@abdn.ac.uk

Session in English

This session reflects on the intra-twining of method, theory, ontology and epistemology in filmmaking and photography within scholarly research projects and/or projects that blend scholarly and activist research. The session is informed by our positioning within ‘new materialism’, and ‘feminist materialism’ and entanglements with several on-going philosophical and practice ‘turns’ that are: material, post-constructionist, post humanist, affective, ontological, and performative.

We invite papers that are located in one or more of these ‘turns’ and which reflect on performative understandings of visual methods. We are interested in generating conversation about what it might mean to produce visual sociologies that “generate not only representations of reality, but also the realities those representations depict” (Law, 2009). We are also keen to engage with what it means to move from representationalist to performative approaches to method while reflecting on the ethical and political dimensions of visual research aimed at “making a difference” (Bhavnani, 2008), “becom(ing) answerable for what we learn how to see” (Haraway, 1991), and holding “responsibility for the reconfigurings of which we are part” (Barad, 2007).

Papers submitted to this session can include these and other themes:
Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference).

 

Monday, July 14, 2014: 5:30 PM - 7:20 PM

How to Publish Your Visually-Based Research?

Session Organizer
Regev NATHANSOHN, University of Michigan, USA, regev@umich.edu
Jerome KRASE, City Univesity of New York, USA, JKrase@brooklyn.cuny.edu

Session in English

Followed by a Q&A, a panel of experienced visual researchers will share their experiences in publishing their own or others` visually-based researchers.

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 03:30 PM - 05:20 PM

In-visible Design. The Surface and Everything Beneath. Researching Design as a Challenge for Visual Sociology

Session Organizers
Agata NOWOTNY, Warsaw University, Poland, agatanowotny@gmail.com
Monika ROSINSKA, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, rosinska.monika@gmail.com

Session in English

“When you see an object, you make so many assumptions on it” – says the narrator of ‘Objectified’ (the documentary film about industrial design). Indeed there is a story embedded in every object. It is true that the first contact is usually the visual one. As sociologists we see and read from object: how was it made, what was it made from, who would buy it, for how much and why? But, what’s more important is that the object speaks to us using other, than visual, language. It’s not only about its color or shape. There are other senses involved but often omitted in our research, like taste, smell or temperature. We not only see an object, we feel it and interact with it.

Design has long ceased to be a realm of still objects. Nowadays design is interactive, multisensory and based on process. Therefore we call it invisible design highlighting other than just visual aspects.

The invisibility of design has also deeper meaning. It aims to grasp everything beneath the visual surface: technology, process of thinking, prototyping and interaction with users and to expand the meaning of design so it includes also services and models of thinking, not only material products.

These are important issues that must be considered if researching design. And as such it is the huge challenge for visual sociology and a good starting point for the discussion about its limitations or possible ways of expanding its field.

Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference).

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Post-Conflict Visual Imaginations

Session Organizers
Regev NATHANSOHN, University of Michigan, USA, regev@umich.edu
Ruthie GINSBURG, Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design, Israel, ginsburgruthie@gmail.com

Session in English

Visuals of conflicts and social conditions of inequalities became part of gender, class, ethnic, racial and national relations around the globe. Researchers have widely analyzed how such visuals can intervene in the social relations of conflict as their representations, their reproductions, their reinforcements, or as contributing to their problematization or to their mollifying mechanisms.

The emerging focus on social conditions of Post-Conflict now requires our attention to what could be regarded as visuals of post-conflict, and to the conditions, challenges, and opportunities of their appearance and intervention.

To critically engage in these questions, we invite presentations of original researches focusing on sociological analysis of empirical data on post-conflict visual imaginations. These could draw on visuals of already existing situations of post-conflict, or of yet to be established post-conflict situations.

Papers could focus on production, circulation and/or reception of the visuals, on the relations between visual imaginations and other art forms (or other sensual dimensions), on memory and forgetting, on legal systems and other formal/informal organizations, on policymaking, etc.

Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference). Papers focusing on an analysis of film productions may be able to show footage of maximum 45 minutes (pending on availability of extra time slots).

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

Stolen Bodies, Reclaimed Bodies

Session Organizer
Carla RICE, University of Guelph, Canada, carlar@uoguelph.ca

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Project ReVision is a Canadian Institute for Health Research funded research project that uses arts-based research methods (digital storytelling and drama workshops) to dismantle stereotypical understandings of disability and difference that create barriers to healthcare.

We have completed year one of our project and have generated an impressive archive of over 40 digital stories from women living disabilities and differences and healthcare providers.

The project emerges from a representational history of disabled people can largely be characterized as one of being put on display or hidden away.

People living with disabilities and differences have been, and continue to be, displayed in freak shows, medical journals, charity campaigns, and as evil or pitiable tropes in novels and films. At the same time, disabled bodies have also been hidden in institutions, hospitals, group homes, and generally removed from the public eye. In his essay from which we borrow our title, Eli Clare writes, “Just as the disabled body has been stolen, it has also been reclaimed” (2001).

In our proposed session, we screen and analyze a selection of digital stories on visible and invisible differences made through Project ReVision. We examine the ways bodies and experiences of difference are reclaimed in these films, which reveal the complexities—the pride, shame, pains, struggles for rights and wellness, and joys of community—of living with disability and difference.

By pairing and sharing stories made by women and health providers on experiences of and encounters with disability and difference, we examine how our project helps to blur boundaries and breakdown barriers between the disabled and non-disabled worlds.

The interweaving of these stories encourages reflection on how failure to fit with ablest standards of normal might open up other possibilities and deepen appreciation of the uncertainty and ambiguity that is the basis of life.

 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

The Shapes of Society; Material, Environmental and Situational Constraints of Interpersonal Space (The Cross-Cultural Perspective)

Session Organizer
Piotr SZTOMPKA, Jagiellonian University, Poland, piotr.sztompka@uj.edu.pl

Session in English

Most of our everyday life is spent among and vis-a-vis other people, within interpersonal space. Apart from all our "higher" human features we are also material, bodily creatures, and therefore the types and qualities of relations we enter with others depend to some extent on the character of material, environmental and situational "containers" within which we act. They provide constraints, limitations as well as opportunities, facilitations for specific actions. The examples would include: landscape, urban or rural design, networks of roads, architecture of houses and apartments, setup of offices and factories, design of malls, restaurants and cafes, lecture halls and auditoriums, stadiums and arenas, parks and gardens, cars and train carriages, shape of furniture, but also the presence of other bodies – density of actors within the limited space, character of collective event taking place, closeness or openness of the situation allowing or preventing exit etc.. These material, environmental, and situational "containers" differ across cultures and civilizations. Perhaps they also differ across occupational communities, age groups, gender etc.

We expect photographic projects which will grasp this cross-cultural variety, accompanied by interpretation of the underlying, culturally specific axio-normative rules which underlie the nature of "containers" and through that medium regulate and coordinate human action in interpersonal space.

The intention is to follow the inspirations of two classical authors: Erving Goffman`s dramaturgical perspective (e.g. Relations in Public, 1971) and Edward Hall`s proxemics (e.g. The Hidden Dimension, 1966), and by linking them via visual method provide new theoretical insights.

Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference).

 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014: 03:30 PM - 05:20 PM

The Visible City? Part I

Session Organizer
Shannon WALSH, City University Hong Kong, China, shannondawnwalsh@gmail.com

Session in English

Not open for submission of abstracts.
Cities and neighbourhoods provide multiple forms of visual data in which to understand social issues and inequalities. This panel will explore what the visual revealed in two collaborative feature documentaries: “Jeppe on a Friday” and “St-Henri the 26th of August”. A city can be seen in news reports, crime statistics or the backgrounds of post-apocalyptic Hollywood blockbusters. It can be explored through guided tours, from behind rolled up car windows or through politics and history. In the documentary “Jeppe on a Friday” (87 min) Shannon Walsh and Arya Lalloo bring together a team of South African women directors to explore a different city: the Johannesburg that beats in the men who occupy it. The result is an intimate, quiet portrait of five people from Jeppe, a decayed inner city neighbourhood. As they grapple with the existential and mundane, the city`s specific textures and social contradictions are revealed. “Jeppe on a Friday” draws from a rich tradition of city-centered direct cinema, and offers a record of life in Johannesburg that demystifies the often-maligned male-dominated metropolis.

“Jeppe” follows “St-Henri the 26th of August” (2011, 85 min) in which 16 Montreal filmmakers captured a variety of stories and lives in the working-class neighbourhood of Saint-Henri in Montreal. “St-Henri” explores everyday social practices and usage of urban territory in creating community. In this panel, filmmakers and visual anthropologists reflect on their experiences as part of these two film projects exploring everyday practices in the city.

 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014: 05:30 PM - 07:20 PM

The Visible City? Part II

Session Organizer
Shannon WALSH, City University Hong Kong, China, shannondawnwalsh@gmail.com

Session in English

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 08:30 AM - 10:20 AM

The Visual Culture of Migration: Private and Public Negotiations

Session Organizers
Anna SCHOBER, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany, anna.schober@sowi.uni-giessen.de
Jorn AHRENS, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Germany, joern.ahrens@sowi.uni-giessen.de

Session in English

Migration is triggered by social inequality and at the same time migration produces new inequalities. Visual figurations of migration or of migrants are used – in official and public or individual perspectives – to challenge inequality or to make it a topic of discussion, to constitute communality anew and to position the individual in an everyday life shaped by migration. In doing so, migration is usually staged either as a problem or as a spectacle. In both cases the figure of the migrant, however, acts as a projection figure, in order to explain processes of change (for example as scapegoats), to advertise and guide “integration” and to position one’s own self and replenish it with qualities of the other.

Nevertheless, migration is not only a central figuration in the framework of a discourse about the societal, cultural other. It is also subject in discourses by the other, which take account of the perspective of this other. To this effect immigrants use visual culture in order to achieve socialisation and in order to claim public presence – for example in the form of “ethnic” festivals, public parades and manifestations or in the form of more enduring urban inscriptions such as cultural centres. And in the private realm, too, visual culture (Skype, cell-phone videos, Internet blogs) is used in order to cope with a family and communal life that is marked by transformation. In this way new communities are constituted and family is practised over wide spatial and temporal distances in transformed ways.

The panel discusses such relations between representations of migration in visual culture and a tactical use of visual media in order to master change in connection with migration. Representation from outside and self-representation are confronted with one another and become perceptible in their differences as well as in their mutual borrowings.

Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference).

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 10:30 AM - 12:20 PM

Visual Images and Arts in Ageing Research

Session Organizer
Wendy MARTIN, Brunel University, United Kingdom, wendy.martin@brunel.ac.uk
Elisabeth-Jane MILNE, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom, EJ.Milne@ed.ac.uk

Session in English

 

Thursday, July 17, 2014: 05:30 PM - 07:20 PM

Visualizing Social Disparities

Session Organizer
Dennis ZUEV, University Institute of Lisboa, Portugal, tungus66@gmail.com

Session in English

The session seeks to address the challenges and advantages of using visual approach to studying socially constructed disparities or differences, which can be associated with 1. Different levels of underlying social advantage or position in a social hierarchy. 2. Social advantage or position reflected by economic resources, occupation, education, racial/ethnic group, gender, sexual orientation, and other characteristics associated with greater access to resources, influence, prestige, and social inclusion.

We are interested in studies that attempt to visually interrogate the matters of enhancement and reduction of social disparities in various fields of human interaction and in various geographic locations. We invite submissions that can be either methodology-focused, or theoretically informed empirical papers.

How can we study social disparities visually and in different sociopolitical contexts? What can visual methods help to reveal about the nature of inequalities and social hierarchies?

Presenters will be asked to send a draft of their full papers (of 6000 words, including references) to session organizers by 12 June 2014 (one month prior to the conference).

 

Wednesday, July 16, 2014: 07:30 PM - 08:50 PM

WG03 Business Meeting and Rachel Tanur Awards

Session Organizer
Regev NATHANSOHN, University of Michigan, USA, regev@umich.edu

 

Joint Sessions

Click on the session title to read its description.

Perceiving, Understanding and Envisioning the Environment

Joint session of RC24 Environment and Society and WG03 Visual Sociology [host committee]

 

Production, Circulation and Cossumption of Visual Conceptual Frames

Joint session of RC37 Sociology of Arts and WG03 Visual Sociology [host committee]

 

Too Much and Too Little: Urban Landscapes of Homelessness and Gentrification

Joint session of RC21 Regional and Urban Development and WG03 Visual Sociology [host committee]

 

Using Visual Material for Knowledge Creation: The Process of Analysis and Interpretation.

Joint session of RC37 Sociology of Arts and WG03 Visual Sociology [host committee]

 

Visual Methods in Ageing Research: Methodological Issues

Joint session of RC11 Sociology of Aging and WG03 Visual Sociology [host committee]

 

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March 2014